Dropbox Embraces the Work/Life Balance

Posted on July 21, 2021 by Paul Thurrott in Cloud with 3 Comments

Dropbox isn’t a particularly affordable cloud storage service, but it has announced a host of new features aimed at both work and personal needs.

“Work has been forever transformed, and the divides between our personal and professional lives have continued to recede,” the Dropbox team writes in its announcement post. “To help you manage the transition into this new world, we’re continuing to develop new tools to support you at home and at work.”

There are a metric ton of new features, so I’ll highlight some of the more notable ones here. They are:

File conversion. Now, you can convert files to different formats—i.e. JPEGs to PNGs—without leaving Dropbox.

Simplified UX. The Dropbox experience that’s available from the Windows taskbar (or Mac menu bar) has been simplified to show your most recent content at a glance.

Automatic photo backup. Now, even Dropbox Basic users can automatically back up photos and videos from mobile devices to Dropbox and then access them on any device. Granted, Dropbox Basic only provides 2 GB of free storage. But you can save space on your phone by removing photos after backing them up as well.

Dropbox Passwords improvements. Dropbox operates a password manager so that you can seamlessly log in to websites and apps. This feature is being enhanced with a Passwords browser extension, password sharing capabilities, and support for saving credit and debit cards for making web and mobile payments.

You can learn more from the Dropbox website.

Tagged with

Join the discussion!

BECOME A THURROTT MEMBER:

Don't have a login but want to join the conversation? Become a Thurrott Premium or Basic User to participate

Register
Comments (3)

3 responses to “Dropbox Embraces the Work/Life Balance”

  1. christianwilson

    I don't mean to sound ignorant on this subject, but how popular is Dropbox these days? They were the popular choice for cloud storage several years back, but my impression is they fell behind to services that were part of the ecosystems people use (Google Drive, OneDrive, iCloud Drive). Is Dropbox still popular with businesses and consumers?

    • arnstarr

      Slack said yes to Salesforce at the right moment. Dropbox should have said yes to Steve Jobs 10 years ago.

    • awright18

      I probably should do a re-evaluation, but we chose drop box for personal use several years ago because it worked better than anything else available. I do like the only in the cloud features on other services entry or free tiers though. I think this requires an upgraded plan in drop box. I can't say that I know anyone else that uses dropbox though. I personally use dropbox, one drive, and google drive accounts for different things.

Leave a Reply