Looks Like Microsoft is Killing the UWP Version of Skype Too

Posted on March 18, 2020 by Paul Thurrott in Skype, Windows 10 with 42 Comments

It looks like Microsoft is killing its Skype for Windows 10 app and will replace it with the standard desktop Skype app instead.

There’s no official word of the change—which appears to mimic what Microsoft’s doing with OneNote—but it was first spotted by the Italian tech blog Aggiornamenti Lumia, which tweeted that the Skype Preview App has suddenly been replaced with the standard desktop Skype app in the Microsoft Store.

“[Microsoft] obliterated every good thing the UWP [app] still had,” one Twitter user commented on the changes. “No more People app integration. No more sync with Outlook. No more automatic [Microsoft account] sign-in. No more app pausing/working in [the] background. No more good-looking title bar.”

Also missing: inline replies in notifications and Share integration. But I’m not sure these missing features mean much, as many could return as the desktop app is improved.

As you may know, Microsoft maintains multiple Skype clients, and Windows 10 users typically use the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) app version that ships with that operating system. But Microsoft has been testing a Preview version in the Microsoft Store that represents the next major evolution of the client. To date, the Skype Preview apps had been based on UWP, but Microsoft is no longer backing that as its desktop app platform of the future. So the backstepping from UWP continues, as expected.

 

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Comments (51)

51 responses to “Looks Like Microsoft is Killing the UWP Version of Skype Too”

  1. madthinus

    Can Microsoft just get a Skype strategy first?

  2. rm

    I'm confused, so they want there productivity software to run slower on Windows 10x?

  3. nkhughes

    They said they'd be restoring the functionality missing from the v7.x 'classic' Win32 Skype...I'm still waiting for my Plantronics handset to work properly again, i.e. for the handset buttons to actually work. I bought it about 6 months before they dropped v7.x. I don't have much faith in them moving over any missing things from the UWP version.


    The current desktop version is also one of the most unreliable applications on my Win10 laptop. When it's not shutting down for no apparent reason, it's just sitting there no longer updating the contacts' status reliably.

  4. Omen_20

    I don't even know what the old version looks like since I've only used Skype in UWP form on Windows 10. I like many would only use the win32 version of OneNote 2016, but in this situation I'm afraid I'll miss UWP Skype. It works really well for chat and video calls. I'm curious if this has anything to do with Skype being added to Teams eventually.

  5. BigM72

    I thought we decided that a "UWP-only" future was killed by Microsoft but that UWP as an option amongst many would continue to exist. I think this was the discussion we had in the context of Windows 10X viz just how dead UWP was?


    If 10X is the future of Windows, why are they still preferring "normal" desktop apps to UWP ones?

    • Paul Thurrott

      All we can do is speculate, but Windows 10X will run web apps just fine too. Perhaps Microsoft sees PWAs/web apps as the future. And Teams is a web app.
  6. r2d22

    Some more objective details:


    "Skype replaced its "UWP" app with Electron, but honestly, it was barely UWP already. It had a Win32 component and it used a web framework for the UI. Almost nothing about it was native. The original Skype uwp app was great, and it's been downhill ever since they switched to web."


    source: twitter.com/kid_jenius/status/1240292862274596865

  7. smithpm

    Maintaining UWP and non-UWP versions of Skype is as silly as having separate Premium and Standard user comments on thurrott.com

    • Paul Thurrott

      Yeah. Except one company has $33 billion in revenues each quarter and the other one has one web developer with a long list of bigger problems. So I guess they're not as silly as each other, really.

  8. mixedfarmer75

    I thought the Skype strategy was Teams?

  9. Fuller1754

    Due to Coronavirus, I've been hearing lots about Zoom and nearly nothing about Skype. My work ... implementing Zoom. Wife's work ... meets via Zoom. Bible study? Zoom. My financial adviser? Working remotely and using Zoom. I would guess I've heard people mention Zoom ten times more than Skype in the last two weeks. If I were Microsoft, this would worry me.

  10. hansolo

     Meanwhile the Xbox app is finally ditching electron for UWP


  11. truerock2

    I really liked the design of NetMeeting. NetMeeting was an example of almost perfect design.


    I have always hated Skype. Skype has never been intuitive and its GUI design is messy.


    I'd paste an image of NetMeeting into this post - except, how do you do that on this board?

  12. red77star

    Generally speaking Microsoft lost market share with Skype anyway. I use Viber and Signal. This UWP thing never had a future, as Microsoft learned that they can have same UI with Win32 counterpart there was no point of UWP anymore. Microsoft stats show that people remove UWP Skype from Windows 10 and install standard Win32 Skype. I think this is a good thing. Microsoft is going to get rid of dual nature of Windows they introduced with Windows 8.

  13. nerocui

    Saw this coming a mile away. As good ReactXP is, it's not popular. Maintaining a framework for just one project is just too much work. Wonder what's going to happen to the Android and iOS counterpart now.

  14. hrlngrv

    Wouldn't it be kinder just to kill UWP?

  15. kshsystems

    So, how much time has Microsoft lost again, with dead end Skype strategies?

  16. bradavon

    I just had Skype for Windows 10 (UWP) replaced with Skype for Windows Desktop (Win32) :(. It's so recent the Store listing still says it's the Windows 10 version and lists ARM under System Requirements tab. Which is no longer the case.


    It looks pretty ugly compared tot the Win10 App which properly fitted into Windows 10 design language.


    I use a Surface Pro X so have gone from Skype with full ARM4 support (UWP), to Skype under emulation with the 32-Bit version. I now have a lag I didn't before, granted not a big lag but a lag still the same.


    Frustratingly Electron is available for ARM64, but Microsoft seem to be content WoA devices using the 32-Bi x86 versions of Skype and Teams. Hopefully Skype 32-Bit runs better than Teams 32-Bit, loads of reports of crashing.


    Electron uses a load of RAM. Which isn't what you want when you're emulating.

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