Worth Switching from DropBox to OneDrive for Everything Yet?

11

Is it worth switching, if you are an O365 Home user, to using OneDrive for everything? I know one of the issues is I use OneDrive (Personal) and for Work so that complicates my setup on my work laptop. It always seems like the sync engine to upload photos on my family’s phones never works with OneDrive so I’m hesitant as I want fire and forget photo backups, etc.

 

Thanks,

 

Kris

Post Reply

Join the discussion!

BECOME A THURROTT MEMBER:

Don't have a login but want to join the conversation? Become a Thurrott Premium or Basic User to participate

Register
11 Comments
Sort by Votes | Date
  1. Paul Thurrott
    1 | Reply
    Paul Thurrott Alpha Member #1 - 1 month ago

    My experiences with OneDrive for the past many months, certainly all this year, have been very positive. I will need to keep my Dropbox account for work related reasons, and I still find OneDrive first-time sync to be slow. But beyond that, I think it's pretty much there. In other words, you can trust it to work.

    1. 0 | Reply
      ecumenical - 1 month ago
      In reply to paul-thurrott:

      Paul, or anyone else with knowledge of this specific issue - have they fixed the problem(s) that would result in numerous sync errors with Office documents that were being edited frequently? Not just occasional photo backups or whatever?

      I gave up on OneDrive because documents would often show red x's in File Explorer and multiple versions of the file would be created. At one point I lost work and decided I had to move to something else. But I'm paying Google (which has other issues of its own, though at least works without losing data) when I already have Office 365 so would prefer to move back to OneDrive if these problems have been sorted out.

    2. 1 | Reply
      Polycrastinator Alpha Member #163 - 4 weeks ago
      In reply to ecumenical:

      That stuff seems to be related to the Office Upload Center, which insists on uploading/syncing documents to OneDrive itself rather than letting the normal client do it. It is, and I think always has been, an unreliable train wreck that they don't allow you to remove because reasons. And I suspect the reasons are that they hate people.

    3. 0 | Reply
      jecouch66 Alpha Member #487 - 4 weeks ago
      In reply to Polycrastinator:

      Agreed.  And lmao.

    4. 0 | Reply
      quasi007 Alpha Member #479 - 4 weeks ago
      In reply to ecumenical:

      Our office is still having the problems you mention.  Consumer OneDrive seems to work just fine, but OneDrive for Business and SharePoint syncing are still very unreliable for us.

    5. 0 | Reply
      krisarthur Alpha Member #319 - 4 weeks ago
      In reply to quasi007:

      Yeah, I would agree but am trying it now to save the money and so far so good... but I'll update everyone here with how the sync goes (187GB so should be a good sample).

      Kris

  2. 0 | Reply
    Patrick3D Alpha Member #994 - 4 weeks ago

    I only use OneDrive for syncing files between devices and have both a personal and work account. At work, we move our Documents and Desktop folders to OneDrive and have very few problems. The only things to be careful of are files/folders with special characters in their name (!@#$%, etc...) and database files that are constantly updated, including Outlook .pst files. We have experienced errors in Outlook with Archives being synced. For programs that use special characters in their file and folder names which cannot be changed without breaking the program, we simply move the location of their respective folders outside of Documents, we have not run into a program yet that did not offer this functionality.

    As for photo syncing, I use my personal OneDrive account to automatically sync all photos I take with my iPhone. It takes an average of 2 minutes for them to sync automatically, when I am in a hurry I just open the OneDrive app on the phone and look in the pending folder which will trigger a sync on the spot. Each photo takes about 4 seconds to upload over my home Internet.

  3. 0 | Reply
    ozaz - 4 weeks ago

    I wouldn't.

    Key issue for me is OneDrive does not provide versioning support for general (non-MS Office) file types.

  4. 0 | Reply
    PracticalEdd Alpha Member #2305 - 4 weeks ago

    I've found that OneDrive seems to have up'd it's game this year as well, however the fact that it doesn't provide versioning for non office documents is a big problem when using it as a back up service because it prevents you rolling back if you get hit by ransomware etc.

     

    As an aside there is a work around for that awful (and I've literally lost hours of work to it) office upload manager rubbish. If you make the relevant OneDrive folder a network share and then always access the files through that it'll trick the upload manager into ignoring it and let the background engine just do it's job.

  5. 0 | Reply
    inlocoabsentia Alpha Member #1634 - 4 weeks ago

    I use OneDrive for everything, except for serious code projects that I keep in source control and for some downloads. I'm pretty happy with it, though I still have a Windows Server Essentials backup. If you don't have something like that, I recommend a period system image backup to protect against stuff like ransomware.

  6. -3 | Reply
    crysmarye - 4 weeks ago

    My experiences with OneDrive for the past many months, certainly all this year, have been very positive. I will need to keep my Dropbox account for work related reasons, and I still find OneDrive first-time sync to be slow. But beyond that, I think it's pretty much there. In other words, you can trust it to work.

    dissertation writing service