Microsoft Lumia disappearing into statistical black hole

16

According to this recent article if your phone is not IOS or Android is part of a 0.3% market share. 

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/03/google-android-hits-market-share-record-with-nearly-9-in-every-10-smartphones-using-it.html

This is not Windowsphone. This is Microsoft, Blackberry and everyone else who makes a phone that hasn’t got Android or IOS on it. Theoretically Microsoft share of 0.3% could be 0.00001%.

Of course Windows 10 Mobile is just a compiler option on Windows 10 builds with some different libraries. Most serious writers about Microsoft have called time on it’s mobile platform, Microsoft employees dont use it, Microsoft executives dont use it, most retailers dont stock it, many carriers can’t remember ever selling it. 

Microsoft execs never really talk about phone. They vaguely mutter something about “supporting Lumia” or “mobile devices” or “mobile experiences”. 

Full disclosure. I use a Lumia 950 everyday but I am resigned to an almost app free experience. There is some stuff there; a news feed, twitter, facebook and spotify. It’s not great. People have spent money and are having a second class mobile experience by staying in the Microsoft ecosystem.

Microsoft need to put this thing down. It’s wounded. There has been nothing released by them in a year. OEMs are thin on the ground and gaining a huge market share of Windows 10 Mobile wont add up to 1% of the mobile market.

Microsoft should treat it’s customers like adults. No doublespeak. The mobile game is done. Kill the platform and move on.  

 

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16 Comments
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  1. 2 | Reply
    innitrichie Alpha Member #1889 - 1 month ago

    I hope Microsoft never gives up on mobile. Windows Phone is still the best, smoothest and most productive mobile platform experience on earth. Apps no longer matter because we have the power of the edge browser on our handsets.

    I know for a fact my Lumia 950 XL is the best smartphone on the market today. Its camera still blows away everything including those shiny overpriced iPhones and the exploding Samsdungs.

    1. 1 | Reply
      plettza Alpha Member #1558 - 1 month ago
      innitrichie Posted

      Apps no longer matter because we have the power of the edge browser on our handsets.

       

       

      I agree somewhat.  Whilst Edge works really well on Windows 10 Mobile, some things just don't lend themselves well to a web browser-based experience such as ebooks or things that need to be stored on the device.  Notifications won't work either.

       

      However, I still agree that "apps" won't be critical anymore because I think that with things like Cortana and AI will do what an app traditionally does.  But I feel the "apps" will eventually integrate with something like Cortana and will provide extensibility to Cortana's capabilities which will be cloud-based.  You'd still go to an "app store" but to add a capability to Cortana rather than a discrete piece of software that runs on the phone/device.  Cortana will be intelligent enough to interact with the extension on the cloud (Azure perhaps) and deliver results to the phone or cache things locally in case of no network coverage.  I don't think in the future we'll be installing apps on the phone and hunting through the UI to open the app and perform some kind of discreet function using simply that app.

       

      I think developers will target things like Cortana, Siri and whatever the Lagroid assistant is called.

  2. 1 | Reply
    WP7Mango Alpha Member #2513 - 1 month ago

    Speak for yourself. I'm having a first class experience with my Lumia 950. I love the platform and have all the apps I need.

    Besides, Microsoft has already confirmed they are continuing with Windows 10 Mobile because it's central to their strategy, not for growth.

    1. 1 | Reply
      hrlngrv Alpha Member #100 - 1 month ago

      In reply to WP7Mango:

      You're both speaking for your respective selves. You have all you need, ponsaelius would prefer a bit more.

      OTOH, in terms of statistics and evidence from what actually has and hasn't sold, ponsaelius would seem to be more representative of the majority of smartphone buyers though unusual in that he bought a Windows phone despite the deficiencies of the Windows Store.

      From my perspective (not an app developer), Windows phones, Blackberries and the diminishing ranks of more exotic phones should go on as long as there's money to burn.

    2. 0 | Reply
      ponsaelius Alpha Member #1328 - 1 month ago
      In reply to hrlngrv:
      I haven't got all I need. I tolerate not having stuff. For example I am on holiday and would like a local transport map of the location. Available on Android and IOS but not on Windows. So you have to go traditional and maybe use Microsoft Maps to supplement paper where possible. Can read the nfc on my local transport smartcard - Android apps only. 
      So yes I have a few things but there are plenty of awkward moments.

       

    3. 0 | Reply
      lwetzel Alpha Member #113 - 4 weeks ago
      In reply to WP7Mango:

      Hey WP7Mango,

      I think it must suck to be an apple device lover.  You have the best of everything so that just leaves one thing in your life to live for.  That is to complain about Microsoft and Microsoft products.  What do you think?

       

    4. 0 | Reply
      illuminated - 1 month ago
      In reply to WP7Mango:

      I also like my 950 but at this point I do not understand what Microsoft's strategy is. Stopping all windows phone manufacturing looks like the end of the product. Support for OS will end in January 2018 and most likely we would not see anything else after that. It seems that Satya is trying to starve Windows mobile to death. Maybe the grand strategy is to become a back-end provider and get rid of all client-OS platforms starting from Windows 10 Mobile, then proceeding with windows 10, xbox and the rest.

    5. 0 | Reply
      ponsaelius Alpha Member #1328 - 1 month ago
      In reply to illuminated:

      Windowsphone would be on life support if Microsoft paid the power bill instead of relying on occasional oxygen deliveries of hope from OEMs and rumours about a Surface device.

      Sidebar: Just discovered tonight that Cortana can track packages. Great I thought I am waiting for a delivery. Unfortunately not even implemented in the UK. 

  3. 0 | Reply
    jwpear Alpha Member #2194 - 1 month ago

    They have killed the platform, right?  No new hardware to speak of and nothing on the radar.  Sure a few rumors, but I don't put much into those.

    They're just sustaining the barebones mobile OS to keep Windows ARM and SFF ready, hoping that someone might come along with a unique way to put it to use.  They probably also hope that UWP apps will grow and there may eventually be enough organic app momentum to make mobile viable again.  It doesn't seem like that's the direction we're heading, especially with players like Amazon abandoning their app, but who knows.  Apple kept chugging along on life support and finally found a new trick.

  4. 0 | Reply
    Dan Alpha Member #291 - 1 month ago

    I have an HTC Winphone provided by my employer (no idea why, its never updated an a huge security threat to the corporate network) and use an iPhone for personal use. 

    Waiting for the day when I accidently drop my Winphone and it stops working. What a piece of trash. Can't stand the tiles UI.

    1. 2 | Reply
      illuminated - 1 month ago
      In reply to Dan:

      Hate tiles? Wow, how original! Just break the damn phone and stop complaining. And no, your phone is not a security threat. Nobody knows how to hack it and nobody cares.

  5. 0 | Reply
    inlocoabsentia Alpha Member #1634 - 4 weeks ago

    With HP and Alcatel (wat) just having released higher end phones, they can't declare it dead yet. The big thing for Windows 10 Mobile this year is a VR experience. Who knows if that will possibly work, but I guess we'll see.

  6. 0 | Reply
    illuminated - 1 month ago

    I have no idea what Microsoft strategy on mobile is but if they give up on mobile then there is no need to have Windows on ARM. If there is no need for ARM then there is no need to have universal windows platform because phone form factor is gone and there is only x86 and x64 Intel CPUs left. If there is no need for universal apps then Microsoft store (online not brick and mortar) is not needed as well. With mobile OSs growing Microsoft's strategy looks like a perfect way to slowly kill all OS business in 10 to 15 years.

  7. 0 | Reply
    johnh3 - 1 month ago

    It seems that they will stick with Windows 10 Mobile even with a 0 % marketshare according to Terry Myerson . It will be to hard to come back to ARM with something else. And it will be the end of the UWP app concept to.  So I guess they will continiue to work with what got and maybe in 2017 they will show upp a Surface phone. 

    1. 0 | Reply
      WP7Mango Alpha Member #2513 - 1 month ago
      In reply to johnh3:

      It won't be the end of UWP because UWP is for all Windows device categories such as Xbox, HoloLens, Surface Hub, tablets, laptops, desktops, hybrids, IoT, phones, and any other new category which comes along in the future.

    2. 1 | Reply
      hrlngrv Alpha Member #100 - 1 month ago

      In reply to WP7Mango:

      Purely guesswork, I figure enterprises now pay at least 3 times as much as consumers for application software annually, and the ratio of enterprise to consumer application software revenues is only going to grow. What do UWP app sales revenues from enterprises look like?

      I figure 90% or more of UWP app sale revenues will come from consumers, so have little prospect for appreciable growth. Even with decreasing annual PC sales and stagnant PC usage, Windows PCs will constitute 80% or more of all devices running some version of Windows for another decade at least. And unless something changes VERY VERY MUCH, those Windows PCs will still be able to install software which isn't UWP, and UWP will remain a small niche in Windows software development for a long time to come.