"Cloud Books" ,VR and push into classrooms

11

Paul has talked about the potential of VR headsets in the classroom and cost was one of the potential sticking points. I wanted to mention that the district that my kids go to has purchased several Google Expeditions kits that come in groups of 10, 20, or 30 and the cost avg out to be between $333 and $399 each depending on the package. The package is basically a Viewmaster VR headset, Android phone, router and an Android tablet for the teacher.

At this price point I think there is the potential and the money there for one of Microsoft’s partners VR headsets if they’d be able to run at some level on a “Cloud Book”(just need to compete with the experience that classrooms currently get from a midrange phone). I think this could ultimately give a better experience than the google offering.

I’m not sure if it would be possible, but if Microsoft gave Windows Cloud OS to schools for free, could some Chromebooks possible be upgraded to it? Chromebooks have a large share of education right now and it might be difficult to make much headway with all of the hardware that schools have already purchased. My district at least buys new Chromebooks every few year for high school and then pushs the older ones down to Junior High, and then elementary. They probably don’t want to end up in a place where the high schools have Cloudbooks, and the Junior High and elementary have something different.

Comments (11)

11 responses to “"Cloud Books" ,VR and push into classrooms”

  1. skane2600

    Sure spend $300+ for a novelty item like VR headsets, but parents make sure to bring facial tissues because money doesn't grow on trees.

    • Sprtfan

      In reply to skane2600:

      Didn't say it makes sense, but is a current practice. Also, a couple google expeditions kits for a district of 14,000 probably has educational value equal to or greater than the cost.

      • skane2600

        In reply to Sprtfan:

        What exactly would the kids be learning - how to use Google products?

        • Sprtfan

          In reply to skane2600:

          I'm going to take a guess that you don't know google expeditions is? It integrates with lesson plans in History, Geography, Anatomy, Biology, Space, and more. I think VR has potential to be a useful tool in education and Microsoft would be wise to bring what they can to the table.


          • skane2600

            In reply to Sprtfan:

            No, I didn't know what google expeditions was and your original post talked only about technology. But I don't see how adding VR to the vast existing resources on those subjects makes it more likely that students will succeed. Historically every new technology (radio, TV, computers) has been hyped to help education but the results have never met expectations.

            • Sprtfan

              In reply to skane2600:

              Your second reply (What exactly would the kids be learning - how to use Google products?) was to a post that did mention google expeditions kits. Either way, this is way off track. The point is that schools are spending money in this area already and Microsoft has a product that can compete with the currently used product on price and equal or surpass it in function. Long story short is that price should not necessarily be a barrier as long as the VR headsets can work with a Cloudbook and that is yet to be seen.

              • skane2600

                In reply to Sprtfan:

                I acknowledged that you mentioned google expeditions and that I apparently didn't know what it was. All I meant was that your original post mentioned only the technology involved with google expeditions not the academic aspects.

  2. dave0

    I look forward to our glorious future where Mr. Peters is trying to find an account number so Chad from tech support can help him login. The class will get to see what a defeated adult looks like.

  3. harmjr

    I think the VR will be the 3d paint of the Education event. It will be over produced and under whelming. It will not be the day to day driver that students need to learn on. After watching all the podcast over the past two weeks I think creating a "Cloud Book" a very cheap laptop that runs Windows Cloud maybe even a flip around Yoga device that a school can manage and lock down the apps your child gets. Plus the recent edition of eBook or epub support to Edge you can possibly get some of the education vendors on board. I work for a community college and when windows 8 rolled out the worst call we would get is one from a student running Windows RT. The call would end with you need to TAKE IT BACK... If they make it where students can get an app from the store that is published by the text book publisher and it works on any edition of Windows you may have something... So the rich kind who's parent buys them a Surface can be just as good as the poor kid's $200 laptop. Also Adobe Flash being killed off in major browsers is making a whole for this kind of publisher managed apps. HTML 5 apps are not coming along as fast as they should. I also think some kind of Surface Hub for education. Where I work every class room has a PC and projector. However if they can come up with a Surface Dial or Surface tools or some kind of Whiteboard solution that may innovate the classroom as well.

  4. Dan1986ist

    Going from Chromebooks to Devices running Windows 10 Cloud would require purchasing of new devices by the school district(s) in question and depending on how many devices are required by faculty and students, it may or may not be feasible.

Leave a Reply