TPM and Secured-core is not new

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I found this while surfing some Win 11 install sites. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/device-experiences/oem-highly-secure

Comments (7)

7 responses to “TPM and Secured-core is not new”

  1. wright_is

    Hmm, my first reply seems to have disappeared.


    Secure core PCs have been discussed as an optional SKU for corporate administrators for a while now.


    But Windows 11 will make them mandatory, even on home PCs.

  2. simont

    I could see it being a requirement for new PC's. It's difficult for older PC's.


    I will be buying a new PC next year, to run Windows 11. But mainly because my CPU is a 3rd Gen i5 and is now 7 years old so it's time to upgrade :)

  3. scoop

    I had trouble posting the OP, since this site appears to be quite wary of external links. The point I tried to make got lost: The MSFT doc in the link is dated January 2020. The TPM 2.0 and core-level security is not new with Windows 11. That might explain why MSFT seems not to have prepared for the blowback from folks with PCs a few years old. To them, this is nothing new. Typing this on a T430 with a third-gen i5 and TPM 1.2, that has run every version of Windows from 7 through 10 Pro as well as multiple flavors of Ubuntu and Mint, with no performance or security issues.

  4. wunderbar

    Microsoft has required Windows 10 PC's to be TPM equipped since 2015. What's new in windows 11 is making it mandatory for it to be turned on.


    So no, TPM ability in Windows is not new. TPM being *required* in Windows 11 is new.

  5. garythornberry

    Considering how hard it is to keep things safe from hackers, I welcome the new requirements (without a technical background to understand TPM or Pluton). Using Windows 11 to advance security seems reasonable to me. One does not need Windows 11 for productivity.

    I was going to order a new PC in August if Pluton was available. Now I will wait until Windows 11 and Pluton are released (late fall?).

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