Even the Xbox Adaptive Controller’s Packaging is Accessible

Posted on July 25, 2018 by Paul Thurrott in Games, Xbox One with 7 Comments

Microsoft today revealed how it designed the packaging for its Xbox Adaptive Controller to be as accessible as the product itself.

“Our packaging is a series of moments that create a unique customer experience,” Microsoft’s Kevin Marshall and Mark Weiser explain in a new post to the Xbox Wire blog. “These moments can manifest themselves in many ways. Physical touchpoints, visual or material cues and structural elements are designed to lead the customer through a logical and seamless unboxing. With the Xbox Adaptive Controller, we knew we had to make the packaging accessible for gamers with limited mobility. That required us to re-think some things about how we package our products, including what type of moments would be most meaningful. It was critically important that we incorporate accessibility into the packaging design and unboxing experience. The out-of-box experience is the first thing customers encounter when they purchase our products and it’s important that we get that right.”

According to the pair, Microsoft designed the Xbox Adaptive Controller packaging in a “no teeth” manner, meaning that customers with limited mobility wouldn’t have to revert to using their teeth to tear through it, as they often have to do with traditional packaging. The firm also ensured that there would be no cuts due to twist ties, zip cords, or sharp-edged paper. Instead, the package unfolds to reveal the product.

“It was through continued engagement with the disability community and research groups that we grew our understanding of what accessible packaging could include,” they explain. “Every time we approach packaging in a new way, we strive to learn as much as we can and leverage those insights across all our work. The Xbox Adaptive Controller required us to think in depth about accessibility in packaging, and we believe it is a powerful milestone on our accessibility journey.”

The Xbox Adaptive Controller is now available for pre-order and will cost $99.99 when it ships to customers in September. You can learn more about this accessible game controller from the Microsoft website.

 

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Comments (7)

7 responses to “Even the Xbox Adaptive Controller’s Packaging is Accessible”

  1. bluvg

    Can they just use this for all products? That hard plastic wrap crap should be banned, if only for the health and sanity hazards.

  2. nbplopes

    In a world of so many bad decisions and doings, I guess that deciding and doing the right thing for the customer becomes a matter of marketing. This is not just a thing of MS, its Apple, Google, ... so on and so forth.


    I fing this disgusting. Misguided morality and lack of moral taste, starting with Apple ...

    • skane2600

      In reply to nbplopes:

      I don't understand your complaint. Obviously marketing's purpose is to sell products but it can also inform people of a product they may find useful to them. The easiest thing for a company to do is to simply blow off people with limited mobility figuring that is too much of a niche market segment to bother with. IMO, better to have such products even if the marketing has a self-serving aspect.

      • nbplopes

        In reply to skane2600:


        Its a not a complaint but an observation.


        I guess, like art, some things if need a description to be understood it has already failed. I think it’s great MS did this controller with accessibility in mind, and would make no sense the packaging not to be inline with that mindset.


        i don’t understand the vote down.

        • bluvg

          In reply to nbplopes:

          I think your comment is not clear, as it certainly doesn't sound like you "think it’s great MS did this controller with accessibility in mind" ("I find this disgusting").

          • nbplopes

            In reply to bluvg:


            Maybe that is the case. My unlike was on this piece of marketing material:


            "These moments can manifest themselves in many ways. Physical touchpoints, visual or material cues and structural elements are designed to lead the customer through a logical and seamless unboxing. With the Xbox Adaptive Controller, we knew we had to make the packaging accessible for gamers with limited mobility. That required us to re-think some things about how we package our products, including what type of moments would be most meaningful. It was critically important that we incorporate accessibility into the packaging design and unboxing experience. The out-of-box experience is the first thing customers encounter when they purchase our products and it’s important that we get that right.

            ....

            It was through continued engagement with the disability community and research groups that we grew our understanding of what accessible packaging could include,” they explain. “Every time we approach packaging in a new way, we strive to learn as much as we can and leverage those insights across all our work. The Xbox Adaptive Controller required us to think in depth about accessibility in packaging, and we believe it is a powerful milestone on our accessibility journey."


            None of this is useful information for the consumer. The first "bold" is as expected, why make an accessible tool that the target consumer could not unbox? The second "bold" I guess they better test their products regardless of the kind of gamer.!!!!


            Add to this the other article one the bad timing of "Windows Updates" ---- "after 4 years we will now adopt a ultra sophisticated AI system that learns you habits to choose the best time to update in order not to screw you work ...."


            Are these guys serious? If I did not knew better, it would look like they are taking the p ... on quality.


            Sorry. I don't understand the votes down. Of course no sane person would be against making products accessible to people with more accessibility constraints, why assume otherwise kind of perplexes me. Its the world we live in I guess. I think we the consumer reached a point of really, really low self esteem when it comes to their relationship with their suppliers.


            We as a society seam to be on the verge of something because people expectations have reached a rock bottom.


            Cheers.

        • skane2600

          In reply to nbplopes:

          Although I disagree with you, I'm not among those who down-voted.

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