AMD Launches Ryzen Pro 5000 Series Mobile Processors

Posted on March 16, 2021 by Paul Thurrott in Hardware, Mobile with 15 Comments

AMD announced today that its business-class Ryzen Pro 5000 series mobile processors are now available for PC makers to incorporate into their products.

“Built to meet the demands of the modern workplace, the Ryzen Pro 5000 Series Mobile Processors combine next-level productivity and collaboration with enterprise-class security features and will be available in premium enterprise laptops from HP and Lenovo, which are expected to be available worldwide later this year,” an AMD representative told me.

From what I can tell, the AMD Ryzen Pro 5000 series mobile processors are roughly equivalent to Intel’s vPro-powered chipsets. They provide AMD Memory Guard for use in Microsoft Secured-Core PCs and AMD Shadow Stack for hardware-based protection against malware attacks.

AMD says that its Ryzen 7 Pro 5850U processor provides 8 cores and 16 threads, with “leadership CPU performance,” with up to 57 percent more multi-threaded performance and 23 percent faster performance for home and office productivity than the competition. PCs based on this chipset can achieve up to 17.5 hours of battery life.

The first Ryzen Pro 5000-based PCs will appear in the market in the second quarter of 2021.

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Comments (15)

15 responses to “AMD Launches Ryzen Pro 5000 Series Mobile Processors”

  1. Avatar

    crunchyfrog

    The idea of 17.5 hours of battery life is a lovely one. The reality of actual battery life is something else.

  2. Avatar

    b6gd

    Intel is the IBM of yesterday and hopefully they will fall hard and make some what of a comeback like IBM did.


    They are so far behind now and the only thing keeping them going is momentum (rapidly slowing momentum) and the fact that AMD can't supply all of the demand.

    • Avatar

      crunchyfrog

      In reply to b6gd: Intel, like Microsoft, has a way of rallying from behind and making big gains in the industry. That said, I am delighted to see the gains AMD has made which is a huge benefit for consumers with the increased pressure of competition.


    • Avatar

      Greg Green

      In reply to b6gd:

      If intel falls then there’s only AMD, which will then start to act like intel until some other whippersnapper puts them in their place. We need both for a healthy market, and apple’s chip endeavors should help even more.

  3. Avatar

    prjman

    I'm using a Zephyrus G14 with last year's Ryzen 4900HS chip. Ridiculously fast, 8 cores, 16 threads and good battery life. I can only imagine that this year's version will be even better.


    Kudos to AMD for finally cracking the laptop market, something that Intel has owned for years. If you are considering a new laptop, the current-gen Ryzen chips are amazing.


  4. Avatar

    simont

    Next year's Surface devices should be powerful and have a really good battery life (in theory).

  5. Avatar

    illuminated

    AMD says that its Ryzen 7 Pro 5850U processor provides 8 cores and 16 threads, with “leadership CPU performance,” with up to 57 percent more multi-threaded performance and 23 percent faster performance for home and office productivity than the competition. PCs based on this chipset can achieve up to 17.5 hours of battery life.


    I love these numbers that say nothing. What are they comparing these numbers to? I feel like I am 37.2% less informed.


  6. Avatar

    JH_Radio

    You'd think the battery would learn your habits and be able to give some kinda claim, which doesn't really help with the manufactures specs.

  7. Avatar

    jimchamplin

    In reply to blue77star:

    Nothing but trees surrounding this lake.

  8. Avatar

    dftf

    Given this is an AMD CPU article, makes sense to ask this here.


    For Intel, from least-to-most powerful by brand/family it goes like this: Celeron -> Pentium -> Core i3 -> Core i5 -> Core i7 -> Core i7 Extreme Edition -> Core i9 -> Core i9 EE -> Xeon


    For AMD I'd assume: Ryzen 3 > Ryzen 5 > Ryzen 7 > Ryzen Threadripper > Epyc.


    So... does AMD have any equivalent of "Celeron" and "Pentium", or is their Core i3 equivalent the lowest? And is the Threadripper closest to an i7 EE, i9 or i9 EE in-terms-of performance?

  9. Avatar

    bservies

    I have a laptop, but after disappointing experiences with small form factor machines, I've come to terms with the fact that I'm a mid-tower kind of guy. Still, when I look at replacing my lenovo, the new AMD chipset will be top of the list.

  10. Avatar

    Greg Green

    In reply to blue77star:

    Intel has been hoping that for how many iterations of 14nm tech?

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