Google PixelBook on Sale for Just $750

Posted on June 2, 2018 by Paul Thurrott in Chrome OS, Chromebook, Mobile with 37 Comments

Google PixelBook on Sale for Just $750

The Google PixelBook is on sale right now for prices starting at just $750, a savings of $250. At that price point, its lowest yet, the PixelBook is almost a no-brainer, assuming you’re looking for a premium Chromebook.

And to be clear, the “entry-level” PixelBook isn’t all that entry-level: This model features a 7th-generation Intel Core i5 processor, 8 GB of RAM, and 128 GB of SSD storage. Those are high-end specs for a Chromebook, for sure. But higher-end models feature up to 16 GB of RAM and up to 512 GB on NVMe-based SSD storage. Granted, they are much more expensive.

All PixelBooks include a 12.3-inch 2400×1600 multi-touch display, a convertible design, an excellent backlit keyboard, two USB-C ports, dual speakers, and battery life of up to 10 hours with fast-charging capabilities in which the device can achieve up to 2 hours of use in just 15 minutes.

The PixelBook stands somewhat alone at the high-end of the Chromebook market, but the recently-announced HP Chromebook x2 comes somewhat close, with a 7th-generation Intel Core M-series processor, up to 8 GB of RAM, 32 GB of SSD storage with microSD expansion, and a 12.3-inch display. That device costs only $600.

Still, the PixelBook is a great Chromebook, and at this price I may actually dive back in myself.

This deal is good until midnight on June 17, 2018. You can purchase the Google PixelBook from a variety of retailers, including Google, Best BuyB&H, and probably a few others. (I don’t see it on sale at Amazon.com) If you do choose Google, you can finance the device interest-free for two years at a cost of about $33 per month.

 

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Comments (38)

38 responses to “Google PixelBook on Sale for Just $750”

  1. ChristopherCollins

    Saw this last night at Best Buy while browsing. There is another $50 Student Deal Coupon I think they will let you stack on that. Having used the base model Pixelbook. I will probably give in and pick one up.

  2. wolters

    I demoed a Pixelbook for 2 weeks and found the experience surprisingly tolerable and productive. At this price, I ordered one. It can, in most cases, be a day to day machines...with both Android apps and Microsoft services.


    The keyboard is one of the best I've ever used and I can be very productive on this. Once you are used to how ChromeOS behaves, it isn't so bad. My only complaint is how the app drawer works. No clean way to organize apps, even if you have options to make folders. It is just a mess.

  3. John Scott

    If you have already bought into the Chrome OS experience and want the absolute best hardware to run Chrome OS which in this case is probably a bit overkill. At least you can save some money doing it. Not sure if I am impressed with all that Google has tacked onto Chrome OS? Like Android apps and now Linux app capabilities? Market share seems to show Chromebooks are still a very small market probably still educational primarily. Most likely that has been because Chromebooks marketed to education are cheap, durable, easily upgraded and managed. Don't appear to making much inroads in consumer or enterprise as of yet.

    • VancouverNinja

      In reply to John_Scott:

      Google is working on abandonding it for a better solution in the next few years. With 1% or leas market share it is a dead platform - Google is stuck in the K-5 educational market with Microsoft coming on hard in the segment; makes a very bad situation for Google potentially even worse over the next few years.

  4. BenIsaacs

    Currys in the UK had a similar offer on a couple weeks back with £200 off all models.


    I had been looking for a bit but with the saving and only really using chrome now I thought I'd dive in- I have no regrets what so ever

  5. Rick Foux

    I want it but still can't justify it. I still have a working Acer Chromebook 14 that I need to go belly-up...


    Maybe I can make the argument that I can run Fuschia builds on it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  6. skane2600

    Still seems to be a lot to pay for such limited capabilities.

    • VancouverNinja

      In reply to skane2600:

      It makes no sense to buy a chromebook at that price when you can have a full Windows 10 system. A Chromebook for sub $200 is okay for a kid but for anyone to buy a Chromebook at a price that would get them a full PC makes zero sense.

      • Lateef Alabi-Oki

        In reply to VancouverNinja:

        It makes a lot of sense of you care about simplicity, security and speed.


        It makes a lot of sense if you want access to native Android apps.


        It makes a lot of sense if you want access to native Linux apps.

        • VancouverNinja

          In reply to mystilleef:

          In what world would someone pay for less capabilities like they are getting more?


          Windows 10 is simple, fast and secure.


          Who wants to run native Android apps on a PC device????


          As for Linux a cheap Chromebook will do.


          Buy a cheap Chromebook if you do not need a Windows 10 system. Paying an premium price to use Android would mean you have more money than proper sense. It is a cheap OS for cheap machines, not premium ones.

      • curtisspendlove


        It makes no sense to buy a chromebook at that price when you can have a full Windows 10 system.


        Which will do what with all that extra power and flexibility? Run a handful of native apps and run a couple dozen apps in browser tabs?


        How is a Windows 10 PC running a bunch of apps in Chrome significantly better than a Chromebook running a bunch of apps in Chrome?


        As the user said above - limited. If you're okay with the limitations, that's fine. I do have to use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. So for professionals, Chromebooks are no gos.


        I’m a professional and don’t use any of those applications. I’m seriously considering trying a Chromebook as my next development machine. I’m used to buying MacBooks, so I could buy 2 or 3 PixelBooks for what I’d normally spend on a MacBook. ;)


        Honestly, just being able to run the Android version of MS Office on a Chromebook probably justifies the entire effort needed to run Android apps, particularly if they want to try a penetration campaign toward business, enterprise.


        Buy a cheap Chromebook if you do not need a Windows 10 system. Paying an premium price to use Android would mean you have more money than proper sense. It is a cheap OS for cheap machines, not premium ones.


        I understand why people feel this way, but my laptop makes me an annual six-figure income. I’m more than happy to pay a hundredth of that income for a pleasurable daily coding experience.


        I’m willing to pay for good build quality and premium feel for devices I use 8+ hours per day.


        Heh, I actually just talked myself into buying one as a trial run after typing this comment. :/

    • wolters

      In reply to skane2600:

      I used to think this until II got to demo and review a Pixelbook for 2 weeks. I found that I was very productive with the Pixelbook and was very surprised by that. The keyboard is amazing as well as the trackpad. I may pick one up at this price and try to live with it when on vacation next week. I am interested in seeing how the SteamLink app works on it for gaming.

    • Lateef Alabi-Oki

      In reply to skane2600:


      Limited?


      You call the ability to run over 2 million Android and Linux apps, natively, limited?

      • skane2600

        In reply to mystilleef:

        I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of applications running on Chromebooks are web apps, then a distant second would be Android apps and in the negligible category would be Linux apps.


        But beyond the raw number of apps that can be run is the usefulness and desirability of those apps.


        As I've stated before, adding Android apps to Chromebooks is a refutation of the fundamental idea behind Chromebooks.

        • Lateef Alabi-Oki

          In reply to skane2600:


          The vast majority of applications running on any desktop OS are web apps.


          So, why is that a had thing for Chrome OS?


          Also, in this day and age, I'd wager most people find their mobile devices, and the apps running on them, more useful, and more personal, than anything their desktop computers offer.


          So Chrome OS is actually an appealing proposition for the majority of users. They have access to all the apps they run on their phones on their Chrome OS device.





          • skane2600

            In reply to mystilleef:

            I never said that web apps on Chromebooks are bad, that's what they are specifically designed for.


            Smartphones excel at different things than PCs do. Those people who find that Android apps on their smartphones are all they need are unlikely to purchase a Chromebook.



            • Lateef Alabi-Oki

              In reply to skane2600:


              I'm not following your reasoning.


              Why do you conclude that people who find Android apps on their smartphone sufficient for their needs are unlikely to purchase a Chromebook?


              If anything, the opposite is true.


              Use-cases are not static. They change depending on time, activity, and context. And therein lies the genius of Android on Chrome OS.


              Users have access to their personal environment on either mobile or desktop form-factors depending what use-case needs to be satisfied.


              A user might find it practical to use Chrome OS when in productivity mode in front of a desk. On the other hand, a phone would be more convenient when the same user is on the road.


              Either way, the user has access to their personal computing environment regardless of the form-factor of the device they choose to use.


              So, it's very likely, and actually logical, that a user completely served by Android, would be better served by Chrome OS compared to Windows or macOS.

              • skane2600

                In reply to mystilleef:

                "Why do you conclude that people who find Android apps on their smartphone sufficient for their needs are unlikely to purchase a Chromebook?"


                Rhetoric aside, compare the number of people who own an Android phone with the number who own a Chromebook. It's funny because the claim has been made that Windows is on the decline because all people need is a smartphone, but now people need a Chromebook too? Even though it offers very little additional functionality compared to Windows? I don't buy it.

                • Lateef Alabi-Oki

                  In reply to skane2600:


                  Chrome OS actually offers more functionality and value compared to Windows. I can't run Android apps natively on Windows. I can't run Linux apps natively on Windows.


                  Again, If you value simplicity, security and speed, Chrome OS is the better platform hands down. It's not even up for debate.


                  I concede there are legacy use-cases where Windows is unavoidable. But those use-cases are niche and rapidly becoming irrelevant.

                • wolters

                  In reply to mystilleef:

                  Agreed. We can coexist. My main PC is a Surface Book 2 but I find myself using a Pixelbook often for day to day use.

      • plettza

        In reply to mystilleef:


        What are its Crysis benchmark scores?

      • jrickel96

        In reply to mystilleef:

        Compared to the 5-6 million apps that Windows has and that most Android apps do not scale up well, yes.


        For a system that has a Desktop marketshare that is under 1%, it's a lot to pay. ChromeOS made up 0.31% of the Desktop market in May 2018 according to NetMarketshare. Guess all those Android and Linux apps have helped it a lot.

        • Lateef Alabi-Oki

          In reply to jrickel96:


          I don't see the correlation between market share and the utility of an operating system. In fact, there isn't any. That's a bogus argument.


          Also, I seriously doubt the Windows store has 5 million apps. And I don't know of any publication that has been able to reliably tally the random Windows executables scattered across the Internet.


          Anyway, whether a platform has 2 million or 5 million apps, that's more than enough for any user to find solutions to the problems they're trying to solve.


          • jrickel96

            In reply to mystilleef:

            Market share means a lot for support. I would argue that Windows Phone had greater utility than Android or iOS, but it didn't have the marketshare or support.


            There are around 700,000 apps in the Windows Store. It trails Play Store (3.8 M) and the App Store (2 M) but is ahead of the Amazon app store. We know the Play Store has a lot of garbage app padding, more than the others. I've submitted apps to Play, so I know there are pretty much zero standards for publication.


            We also know that the amount of Android apps that are configured for tablet use are in the hundreds. Hardly anyone makes apps that do anything other than get blown up on a larger screen, unlike the iPad.


            There is not a reliable tally of Win32 EXEs, though it's known to be above 5 million. Take a look at GOG.com. Out of today's top ten only two work on Linux. Three work on Mac. All ten work on Windows.


            Seven of the Top 25 work in Linux. Ten will work on Mac.


            Adobe Creative Cloud works on Mac or Windows.


            Ross Xpression, a big money product in my business that is used for CG and overlays in most sports stadiums, TV production, etc is Win32 ONLY.


            There are numerous major business apps that function only in Windows, including quite a bit of financial software for banking and trading.


            I've never seen a single Chromebook when visiting a pro sports team or stepping into a TV studio. I occasionally will see a Mac. 75% of those people use iPhones.


            The reality is that Windows is way ahead on gaming and way ahead for business apps with companies that make serious money. So marketshare does matter because NO ONE will be incentivized to make product for something with a tiny marketshare.


            And even Android has a smaller financial footprint that iOS. More money is spent on iPhones and greater profit margins are found in the App Store. Android apps tend to get by on microtransactions and ad revenue.


            Even Linux is a tiny, tiny marketshare for desktop. It is much more substantial on webservers, but average users don't touch that.


            If you like ChromeOS, good for you. I'm glad for you. But I also agree - Chromebooks are limited. Android apps are limited apps and Linux is able to run only a fraction of what Windows can run.


            I just bought a PC with a Core i7, 16GB of RAM, SSD, and AMD graphics for $1000. I could run Adobe CC on that. I could not do that on a $750 PixelBook. I can run full MS Office. Not on PixelBook. I can run iTunes. Not on PixelBook. I can run all the old DOS games from GOG - only a few have support for Mac and/or Linux. And that Core i7 is a 2-in-1 that has active stylus support as well.


            As the user said above - limited. If you're okay with the limitations, that's fine. I do have to use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. So for professionals, Chromebooks are no gos.


            And we can also get into how poor the security is on them and how they are not HIPAA compliant, so if you work in medicine, you can't use them for any patient oriented work. Most lawyers wouldn't touch them either nor does government. That's limited.

            • Lateef Alabi-Oki

              In reply to jrickel96:


              "...I would argue that Windows Phone had greater utility than Android or iOS..."

              ===


              Is this a joke?


              I stopped reading after that.


              You're a legacy user, Windows works for you.


              The modern computer user who has been exposed to the web and mobile platforms has zero interest in legacy Windows applications.


              The web and mobile computing will eventually completely subsume legacy desktop applications. It's not a matter of if, it's a matter of when.


              • skane2600

                In reply to mystilleef:

                "The modern computer user who has been exposed to the web and mobile platforms has zero interest in legacy Windows applications."


                An absurd claim unless "modern" is simply defined as people who agree with you. Windows users were "exposed to the web" years before you could access it from a smartphone and many were early adopters of mobile technologies. Yet many of these people have a keen interest in Windows applications legacy or new.

          • skane2600

            In reply to mystilleef:

            A valuation of utility is subjective. If an OS can't survive in the marketplace, it matters not what a subset of technologists believe is the best one.


            As far as how many apps there are in the Windows Store, for the most part, nobody gives a s**t. It's irrelevant to most Windows users since MS killed the Windows Phone (not that there was all that much interest before then).


            It's Win32 programs that most people value Windows for.

          • VancouverNinja

            In reply to mystilleef:

            Why would anyone buy a Chromebook? Less than 1% market share and less capable than a Windows 10 PC. No one is developing for it and no one uses it. Buying one is a dead end for a consumer and too limited for the business world.

            • Lateef Alabi-Oki

              In reply to VancouverNinja:


              I already stated why people prefer Chrome OS to Windows. I'll reiterate.


              - Chrome OS is more secure than Windows

              - Chrome OS is easier to use than Windows

              - Chrome OS is easier to manage than Windows

              - Chrome OS is faster than Windows

              - Chrome OS is lighter than Windows

              - Chrome OS can run Android apps natively

              - Chrome OS can run Linux apps natively

              - Chrome OS doesn't have a broken update system

              - Chrome OS is not encumbered by the unfortunate baggage of decades-old misguided computing paradigms


              These are all valid reasons to spend more money on a Chrome OS device than a Windows computer.


              Windows is a legacy operating system. Its only relevance is to run legacy applications. In fact, I don't know why any modern computer user would bother using Windows.


              It's dangerous, bloated, unreliable, unwieldy, and overkill for 99% of what we need computers for today. The exception, of course, is legacy applications, and perhaps games.


              • skane2600

                In reply to mystilleef:


                "I already stated why people prefer Chrome OS to Windows"


                Your implicit assumption in this statement is wrong. People don't prefer Chrome OS to Windows and the market proves that. And what's with all this "Chrome OS" stuff rather than Chromebooks? Yes, Chrome OS can run on non-Chromebooks, but the usage share off Chromebooks is really negligible.


                "Chrome OS can run Linux apps natively"



                I'm not sure what "natively" means in this context. If it's running on your device rather than the cloud and it's not being emulated, it's native. Now if you want to use a very restrictive definition of native, Chromebooks won't be able to run Linux apps natively because they will be running inside a virtual machine. The user must also enable this capability, it won't be supported "out of the box".


                But it isn't going to matter much anyway since only a subset of desktop Linux users would be interested and there are very few of them. Anyone who is seriously developing Linux desktop apps is going to end up needing a full distro (or multiple ones).




              • plettza

                In reply to mystilleef:

                Mate, your original argument was refuting the term "limited", which it is purely based on apps as you argued there are 2 million Android apps. Windows had millions more. No one is saying Chrome OS isn't more secure or lighter weight or easier to update.

              • wolters

                In reply to mystilleef:

                Any Microsoft services fan would be fairly happy on a Chromebook, specifically a Pixelbook. You have access to many of Microsoft services via web sites or the Android apps. And the Pixelbook is a premium device. The keyboard and trackpad are among the best I've used.

  7. rmlounsbury

    I've been looking for a new home computer/laptop for the last couple weeks since I've been mostly running on a MacMini (circa 2012) for the last year or so as my wife and I have been somewhat nomadic in the process of buying a house.


    The entry level Pixelbook dropping to this price was enough to make me go ahead and pull the trigger on this device and give ChromeOS another go as my full time operating system. I'm pretty firmly planted in the Microsoft & Google ecosystems (Google for mobile and Microsoft for many services) and don't necessarily need to be on Windows 10 anymore.


    Probably one of the more ironic things is that ChromeOS is free of the advertising Microsoft has foisted upon Windows 10. Also, with the addition of the ability to run Linux Apps without too much futzing and Android apps (heck even Windows applications via Wine or CrossOver) this device can do pretty much anything I could need from a Windows 10 device.


    I tried this experiment with the Chromebook Pixel and it failed miserably but that as before the Android integration had matured and the ability to run Linux apps became viable. I'd just use the Chromebook Pixel but it doesn't have Linux app support as of yet and it looks like they are still working to port that functionality over with that device being stuck on an older kernel (hopefully not a issue with future iterations such as the Pixelbook).

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