Apple Announces New Mac Pro, 6K Display

Posted on June 3, 2019 by Mehedi Hassan in Apple, Mac and macOS with 105 Comments

Apple’s new Mac Pro is finally here. After months, and even years of wait, the company’s Mac Pro is finally out for the public.

The new Mac Pro comes with a design that focuses on modularity and flexibility. According to Apple, users have 360-degree access to the entire system and can easily upgrade their machine as much as they like.

Here are the specs:

  • Intel Xeon processor with up to 28 cores
  • Up to 1.5 terabytes of RAM
  • GPUs: Radeon Pro 580X, Radeon Pro Vega II with 14 teraflops of GPU power and 32GB of HBM2, or Radeon Pro Vega II Duo
  • Eight internal PCIe slots
  • 2 Thunderbolt 3 ports, two USB-A ports
  • Two built-in 10GB ethernet ports
  • A built-in FPGA that allows for incredible compute power
  • Can process up to 3 streams of 8K video, or 12 streams of 4K video at a time
  • A 1.4kW power supply, because someone needs to power all these powerful components

Apple is also announcing a 32-inch 6K HDR display to go along with the new Mac Pro. This is the biggest Retina Display ever built by Apple, and has a resolution of 6016×3364 pixels, P3 and true 10-bit color, super wide-viewing angles, and more. It comes with a Pro Stand that makes the display feel very light, and you can rotate it as well — Apple also allows you detach the display form the monitor and use a VESA mount instead. It’s called the Pro Display XDR because it comes with Extreme Dynamic Range because Apple says its HDR is better than anyone else’s.

I have to be honest, Apple really came all out with the new Mac Pro. It will probably cost a lot, though. For the base model with the 8-core XEON processor, 32GB memory, Radeon Pro 560X, and 256GB SSD, you will have to pay $5,999. And for the Pro Display XDR, it will start at a whopping $4,999. Available this Fall.

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Comments (105)

105 responses to “Apple Announces New Mac Pro, 6K Display”

  1. spullum

    Probably not something I would purchase, but it seems pretty awesome. So far Apple is putting out a lot of what the people (developers and users) were/are asking for this time.

  2. red.radar

    A Pro machine that starts at $5999 and it only buys you storage of 256 GB of storage???


    This thing is priced so it doesn’t cannibalize the iMac Pro skus


    i will say the thermal design of this unit looks brilliant. Full duty cycle computing with no throttling and doesn’t require water and it’s quiet ? Not bad. I also like the rack mount options ...


    just wish i could afford it. Oh well custom built is my future.


    OH man the Cheese Grater memes are priceless.

  3. MikeGalos

    Interesting that on the Pro box they went with USB Type A connectors.

  4. F4IL

    If you listen to the price announcement closely, there's some pretty obvious murmuring and choking bellow stage.

  5. Addkeyboardtoipad

    I think Apple knew everybody was going to be watching closely to see what they did to make up for the “can’t innovate my ass” Trash Can. I was pleasantly surprised to see them address one need after another that pros have been asking for for years. Even down to the adjustable stand for the display. When was the last time you could get a display from Apple where you could adjust the height let alone flip the display intro portrait mode?! Plenty of people will have their little comments though, as is expected. But the pro folks running Final Cut or Logic are going to be very happy (myself included).

    • MikeGalos

      In reply to Addkeyboardtoipad:

      Agreed. Apple did return to producing an actual computer geared toward actual professionals.

      The downside is that it's priced insanely high even for Apple and that will take it out of the market for most of those professionals. And that's just the pricing for a configuration far too low for professional use at that level. Who knows what a real workstation like the ones they demonstrated will cost? We don't even know the pricing for the AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo which was announced for it today.


      I would point out that the stand you are so happy with is an eyewatering $999 as is the add-on price for the anti-glare coating. Even the adapter to let it mount on a VESA stand is an extra $199.

      • bob_shutts

        In reply to MikeGalos: Again, these are not consumer items. The companies who invest in this equipment need crushing speed and this apparently delivers. The cost? It will be written off as a business expense.

        I’m a Mac user for almost all my needs but I always build my own gaming rig. This is the first Mac I’ve ever seen that I don’t think any home built pc can beat. And what’s with that afterburner??? Holy s#[email protected]!


    • wright_is

      In reply to Addkeyboardtoipad:

      Yes, the stand was always a problem, especially with the iMacs. In Germany, health and safety regulations state that all computer displays used in business must be height adjustable and they must have a matt finish, shiny displays aren't allowed.

      Some users were willing to sign a waiver to use an iMac, but, technically, a business couldn't use them - the same goes for the MacBoo * ranges and, to be honest a lot of modern Windows laptops with touch screens.

      But, for $5K, I'd expect the stand to be included!

    • james_wilson

      In reply to Addkeyboardtoipad:

      Im sure the 'Youtuber' Influencers will have fun speccing out a top of the range config for their 'videos', which, ironically, are about the product they use to create the videos.

  6. martinusv2

    Do the Xeon has the Zombyload / MDS bug in them? Hope not for this price. I am surprise to see 1.4w power supply enough for 4 Radeon 7 and the Xeon.

  7. Patrick3D

    So many "pros" are going to end up mounting their $4,999 monitor on a $50 Chinese stand bought off Amazon. On a separate note it appears Apple misunderstood what people were demanding when they asked for a new "cheese grater" Mac. At least the new case shell is not only easy to remove for cleaning, but being made of stainless steel it's dishwasher safe.

  8. siv

    This is definitely for the more money than sense brigade.

  9. bsd107

    The monitor stand is an extra $999.


    Yes. A $1k monitor stand.


    Only Apple....

  10. Tony Barrett

    This device certainly has the Apple 'wow' factor - and a price to match, and obviously it's only aimed at professional designers, which are often Mac houses only. Funny thing is, whenever it actually becomes available, Apple will sell more of these than MS can even dream of with the Surface Studio - just because it's Apple.

  11. dontbe evil

    OMG so cheap, I'm going to buy a mac pro + display + stand ... apple bitten logo included!!!

  12. ianhead

    "$5,9999"!?!?! Sure that's not a typo, Mehedi?


    Oh wait, it's the Apple Mac Pro... yeah, I can believe that.

  13. brettscoast

    Thanks Mehedi

    wow that's some impressive specs right there

  14. bbold

    You have one too many 9's in $5,999, but it may as well be $59K! :D Obv for Creators at work only, but glad to see Apple innovating and keeping competition going. Let's see if Surface Studio or other higher level MS devices are updated accordingly.

    • MikeGalos

      In reply to bbold:

      That high-end version demonstrated with all those expensive monitors ends up well above $59,999. The array of 8 monitors alone is $‭55,984‬. I suspect the four AMD Radeon Vega II Duo cards will more than make up the difference without adding in the cost of the rest of the computer.

  15. truerock2

    So, my family owns a LOT of Apple products - and, we like using them.


    But, is it just me? I think the new Mac Pro is ugly. The original cheese grater was one of my favorite PC designs of all time.


    The little black feet look really stupid and the chrome handles on top stick out in a inharmonious way.

  16. yoshi

    $10,998 for the full package. Or you could buy a new car. Or a boat.

    • lvthunder

      In reply to yoshi:

      And if that computer allows you to complete a project and bring in a million then it's worth it.

      • MikeGalos

        In reply to lvthunder:

        And how many 1-person, 1-computer shops are there that bring in a million dollars and can't do that equally well on a computer that's half the price?

        It may help out on a big job more than a $5,000 system but it isn't the "I couldn't do it on any smaller system" type of sea change. It's a nice efficiency improver. And that's fine but one computer is not going to be the deal maker or breaker on a million dollar project.


        • curtisspendlove

          In reply to MikeGalos:

          And how many 1-person, 1-computer shops are there that bring in a million dollars and can't do that equally well on a computer that's half the price?


          I can go get milk and eggs for my wife on the weekend in my commuter car. But I enjoy the trip a whole lot more if I do it in my '69 Challenger. :: shrug ::

          • MikeGalos

            In reply to curtisspendlove:

            And that's fine. But the point was about the people who can justify it because it will pay for itself.


            I doubt your '69 Challenger pays for itself in its better fuel efficiency in running to the grocery.

            • curtisspendlove

              In reply to MikeGalos:

              I doubt your '69 Challenger pays for itself in its better fuel efficiency in running to the grocery.


              Heh. No, one can practically watch the fuel gauge empty in relation to the tachometer.


              However, I have seen plenty of business deals go to the company with better perceived equipment. Which, price is often an (sometimes inaccurate) indicator.


              There is also the factor that “knowledge workers” are often faster / more efficient when happy (or at least satisfied). Fancy computers are a great way to boost that quotient.


              I think Ivthunder just tossed out “one million” as a random, high price. Feel free to scale it down to whatever makes sense in your brain.


              If a $20,000 dollar computer helps me do 2 $10,000 projects per month instead of 1...how long does it take to pay for itself.


              There are many ways to evaluate the cost benefit of something, just because something seems overpriced to you doesn’t mean there isn’t a context somewhere where it makes sense.

              • MikeGalos

                In reply to curtisspendlove:

                There are but this won't be a doubling of output over a computer at half the price with the same components. It's much more a case of "The sales rep has a nice suit and we play golf together so that IBM is a much better computer than the Univac".


                • curtisspendlove

                  In reply to MikeGalos:

                  Yup, I’m not in the expertise area to estimate that.


                  My cousin (a graphics professional) suggested that the workstation can do in minutes what a typical render farm might take overnight to do. (Granted this is all subjective. I assume that render farm didn’t cost $35k either.)


                  A couple friends in the audio industry told me that thing is a freaking beast and can replace multiple-computer setups. (Granted those multicomputer setups are currently clusters of high end iMacs...so again, replacing ... maybe $10-12k worth of iMacs.)


                  But all of that seems like semantics to me. I don’t know the true value of those things, in monetary or non-monetary terms.


                  I know now that in my area (software development) it wouldn’t be the difference between a feature being completed today instead of tomorrow, but my friends targeting iOS builds really liked (ok, mostly drooled over) the power and flexibility to run more than one or two simulated iOS devices.

                • wright_is

                  In reply to curtisspendlove:

                  Given that a render farm will have much more powerful hardware available to it - generally Intel's really potent "Platinum" range of processors are restricted to server motherboards and "Tesla" modules are also aimed at server farms, rather than individuals; also the Mac Pro doesn't have any really fast IO options granted to it, in the configuration given, I would guess that a heavily specced render farm would still out-do the Mac Pro - the question will be what exactly can the FPGA do and how much is it? Does it cost less than a Tesla unit and how does it perform?

                  Also, the render farms generally use bespoke software, and generally aren't Mac based, so it is comparing apples and oranges.

                  The "cluster of iMacs", if that is only a couple, then, yes it should make a difference - because all the processing is taking place on one device, you aren't having to shunt data back and forth.

                  There will be some things that the Mac Pro will be really good at and, for those locked into an Apple based workflow, it will make economic sense. For those not locked into an Apple workflow, there are more economic offerings with similar or better performance on offer, then it is a question of whether re-training to use the same software on a different platform is more economical than buying a Mac.

                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to wright_is:

                  Exactly. When you're talking about render farms or other high performance computing systems you really are talking about a whole different set of tech than a consumer PC. Network protocols alone are a totally different set of tech as are inter-processor communications.

                • curtisspendlove

                  In reply to wright_is:

                  Yup, again I don't know that stuff. My expertise is software development.


                  Apparently he's talking about the tradeoff to where the more you can render on your workstation instead of pushing it to a render farm is better since they batch process stuff. There's also a bunch of complicated stuff about render quality and what-not that factors into it. Not really any parallels in my world...I can *kinda* liken it in my head to Preview Apps and Production builds...but meh. I don't really care that much.

        • lvthunder

          In reply to MikeGalos:

          Maybe this computer isn't geared towards the 1 person 1 companies. Maybe it's geared towards companies like the Walt Disney Corporation or Universal Pictures. Hollywood is full of companies where money is no object. All that matters is speed.

    • MikeGalos

      In reply to yoshi:

      No, $10,998 for the minimal base configuration plus $999 for the monitor's stand. To get the configuration they demonstrated even with just one monitor figure closer to $20K.

      • MikeGalos

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        Oh, and $1,000 extra if you want that non-reflective coating on the display.


        So we're at $12,997 for a PC with an 8 core processor, 32GB of RAM, a single fairly low-end graphics card and a tiny 256GB SSD (and a really nice monitor).


        To be fair, nobody who is a target for this is going to buy storage from Apple and they'll virtually all go to an external drive array system. But, likewise, nobody is going to be using only 32GB of RAM or that graphics card for the high-end video editing this system is really meant for. So, realistically, that $13K entry system is not a serious version while it is at a serious price.

      • skane2600

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        Sounds like a great bragging machine for C level execs that will mostly be idle once the novelty wears off.

    • bob_shutts

      In reply to yoshi: True but this is not aimed at the consumer market.
    • dontbe evil

      In reply to yoshi:

      guys have an upvote from me, butthurt apple fans are already on the downvote rage

  17. VancouverNinja

    This is supposed to show how they are at the top of game with the best PC possible....


    Apple has a leadership problem.

  18. bob_shutts

    But can it run Crysis? ;)

  19. jaredthegeek

    28 cores, 1.5 TB or Ram or a new car.

  20. MikeGalos

    Apple’s new Mac Pro is finally here.

    No. Apple's new Mac Pro has been announced. It won't be anywhere until the Fall. And even that isn't guaranteed since we've seen that the current Apple management team is fine with announcing and demoing "products" that engineering hasn't figured out how to build.

    • BoItmanLives

      In reply to MikeGalos:

      Imagine going through life this angry, ladies and gentlemen.

      • MikeGalos

        In reply to BoItmanLives:

        Yeah. Being an obedient and unquestioning devout religious follower is an easier life than actually caring about facts but I don't find the cost worth it.


        The Mac Pro is not, as the opening of this article states, finally here.

        It has been announced and something that looks like it has been demonstrated at a show.

        And a ship date has been stated.

        Apple, under this management team, has announced and demonstrated "products" that were vaporware and didn't exist even in engineering.

        Apple, under this management team, has announced ship dates for products and then wildly missed them.

        That's reality. Sorry if that makes you unhappy.

        • pecosbob04

          In reply to MikeGalos: "Apple, under this management team, has announced and demonstrated "products" that were vaporware and didn't exist even in engineering."


          My FSM man! Do you read the things you type? Irony meters all over the world are exploding from having to deal with a statement like that from someone who purports to have been associated with msft during the era of peak FUD.


          • MikeGalos

            In reply to pecosbob04:

            Charging your multiple Apple devices on your AirPower charger? No? But it was not only announced but demonstrated. By that same Apple management team you implicitly trust.


            Apple fans memories are so short and their gullibility is so vast...

            • pecosbob04

              In reply to MikeGalos: Mike please never change. I can always count on you to bering a smile to my face.
              Can you show me another example of an announced and demoed product from Apple that never became available for purchase? And by the way where was the hole located that they dumped all those "surface Minis" (I think that was the name) into a few years back? What ever became of "Longhorn" oh yeah Mista that's the ticket! My trust in Apple I would say is explicit.

              On an entirely different note; if I use cursor insertion to edit a not yet submitted post on this board the results are unpredictable. ie the word unpredictable if auto completed leaves the cursor positioned in front of the word. Any manual insertion behaves similarly. any one else have this issue. (yeah Mike I am using a Mac, take your best shot.)


              • MikeGalos

                In reply to pecosbob04:

                Did Microsoft ever announce a Surface Mini? No.

                Did Microsoft ever demonstrate a Surface Mini? No.


                The "Surface Mini" is one step above the really silly one where the press talked for months about the "Courier" and when it would come to market. And then bashed Microsoft for "cancelling" the "Courier". In reality, Courier was a research prototype done by Microsoft Research to experiment with new UX concepts and Microsoft Research isn't a product team. The press created a rumor of what they wanted to see produced and then pretended it was being produced and then complained about how awful something that had never been set to be produced was "cancelled".


                As for bringing up AirPower, note that this vaporware fraud was done by the current Apple executive and management team. Recently. They demonstrated a "product" that didn't exist and did faked demonstrations and showed mock-ups to the press and promoted it as a reason to buy products they were selling.


                Honestly, every person who bought a device that Apple announced was compatible with AirPower and every company making a competitor both to AirPower and to those AirPower compatible devices should be getting compensation for Apple's deceptive advertising.

                • pecosbob04

                  In reply to MikeGalos: Must have struck a nerve. You got so incensed about the buried minis that you forgot the question.
                   "In reality, Courier was a research prototype done by Microsoft Research to experiment with new UX concepts and Microsoft Research isn't a product team." So you are saying that Courier wasn't leaked as a trial balloon from msft's marketing team upper management? Got it!
                  I continue to be fascinated by your obsession with all things apple. It seems a bit odd for someone of your apparent age and professional associations to focus on a company that is no longer any danger to your livelihood. Hey we all have our demons I guess.


                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to pecosbob04:

                  Correct. Courier was NOT leaked as a trial balloon by anybody. It was a research project at MSR that somebody in the press decided was more and everybody piled on with nothing to go on.

                  I worked at MSR, shipped several of their projects and even got a patent for work I did for them and I know, firsthand, how many experimental projects they do and how little they're tied, by mandate, to the product teams.

                  But, hey, you read some uninformed speculation and bought into a manufactured conspiracy theory so you're the expert.

                • pecosbob04

                  In reply to MikeGalos: Never questioned your expertise Just your objectivity and your grasp on reality.


                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to pecosbob04:

                  Ah, so what statement I made wasn't objective reality?


                  (This should be amusing)

                • pecosbob04

                  In reply to MikeGalos: Well Mike one thing at a time I am still waiting on an answer to my question.
                  "Can you show me another example of an announced and demoed product from Apple that never became available for purchase? "


                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to pecosbob04:

                  Why? If somebody steals your car do you say, "Hey, when they do it twice I'll consider them a car thief"?


                  They didn't exactly "accidentally" build prototypes, create faked videos, put it on the agenda at the show, talk about it for several minutes and present the prototypes in the press room. That was all intentional fraud designed to lie to their customers.

                • pecosbob04

                  In reply to MikeGalos: "Apple, under this management team, has announced and demonstrated "products" that were vaporware and didn't exist even in engineering."

                  But Mikee, in English one way to form plurals is to add an 's' to the end of a word so thinking you were speaking that language I was waiting for you to produce a litany of the examples of said "products".
                  "That was all intentional fraud designed to lie to their customers."
                  Unto what purpose? Why would they do that? More likely the heat issues were proving intractable but they still felt the engineers could solve it and deliver the product and they might have but not at a price point that made sense. You know kind of a "Hard computer science problem". So has msft ever faked a demo? I can think of one recent one they should have (ref. hololens).
                  I've had enough fun for one topic so you get the last word on this. Make it sting!


                • curtisspendlove

                  In reply to pecosbob04:


                  So has msft ever faked a demo? I can think of one recent one they should have (ref. hololens).


                  :: cough :: LONGHORN :: COUGH COUGH ::


                  Pfwheew...sorry ... had something stuck in my throat there.


                  But on a completely random note, I remember how pretty and ambitious Longhorn was...yup ... pretty ambitious. Sometimes engineers overdream, and find out later what they thought was possible wasn't. And sometimes companies announce those things to the press and customer base before they find out it's not feasible in the way they envisioned.


                  Oh, wait! Sorry. Only Apple does that. Again, I keep forgetting what site I'm on.


                  zdnet.com/pictures/windows-longhorn-still-the-most-exciting-windows-ui-to-date/


                  :: sighs wistfully :: ahhhh...pretty...ambitious

            • curtisspendlove

              In reply to MikeGalos:

              Charging your multiple Apple devices on your AirPower charger?


              Well, to bring a little bit of reality into this thread...


              They *did* demo the Mac Pro onstage and in a demo area after the keynote. So they have physical versions. I don’t remember any AirPower mat public demos.

              • MikeGalos

                In reply to curtisspendlove:

                But they weren't offering hands-on time from what I've seen. And they're being coy about configurations and pricing and delivery dates and on exactly what their "afterburner" card does and were downplaying the proprietary video card format so it's not like they're expecting people to do their fiscal planning for next year's purchases on this announcement.


                This has the feel of a very, very tightly scripted demo of a system that's not really finished.

                • curtisspendlove

                  In reply to MikeGalos:

                  I said “demo area” not hands-on. I agree that it was a protected demo, possibly not unlike the first iPhone demo that Steve Jobs did.


                  But I’ll stand by my earlier point: comparing it to AirPower is a bit of a stretch.

                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to curtisspendlove:

                  And the AirPower had a "demo area" where press could even pick up non-working hardware and see units working behind glass.

                  You'll note the lack of actual benchmark data or specs on what configurations actually were used for what few performance specs they listed. Lots of "faster" but all in the vague "Three out of four dentists prefer Crest" technique where the "Prefer it to what?" is left unanswered.


  21. skane2600

    Too bad Apple offers no non-integrated Mac models between the Mac Mini and this Uber-Mac. Of course the Mac Mini isn't what it used to be anyway.

    • curtisspendlove

      In reply to skane2600:


      Too bad Apple offers no non-integrated Mac models between the Mac Mini and this Uber-Mac. Of course the Mac Mini isn't what it used to be anyway.


      You can actually spec up a Mac Mini reasonably, depending on what you want to do with it. But yeah, you aren’t going to get a Mini that can handle audio or video anywhere near this.


      I’m not a fan on integrated monitors either.


      Luckily I don’t need significant graphics capability for my production machines, but I still have to decide if amortizing a $12k Mac Pro over ten years or buying a few new systems is a better option.


      I’m not 100% sure how “compatible with standard graphics cards” the new Mac Pro is. Can I buy the a “cheap” build in the fall, then toss a standard NVIDIA GPU into it in 2021? (Will there even be good NVIDIA drivers for macOS Alcatraz in 2021? I dunno.)

      • MikeGalos

        In reply to curtisspendlove:

        "I’m not 100% sure how “compatible with standard graphics cards” the new Mac Pro is."

        Apparently you need to use cards designed for the MPX (Mac Pro eXpansion module) which adds a second PCIe channel and Thunderbolt.

        • curtisspendlove

          In reply to MikeGalos:

          Apparently you need to use cards designed for the MPX (Mac Pro eXpansion module) which adds a second PCIe channel and Thunderbolt.


          I'm not so sure about this. I've heard Apple guys have said that you *don't* specifically need MPX modules. You can use them as regular double-wide slots. (Including standard GPU cards. The board seems to have standard headers.) Again, drivers. 


          Regardless, I don't need to be able to use *everything*, I have my gaming rig for that. I just need a few options. :: shrug ::

      • MikeGalos

        In reply to curtisspendlove:

        ...  I still have to decide if amortizing a $12k Mac Pro over ten years ...

        Ten year support? That's not the Apple way. Even for Mac Pro users.

        The latest version of macOS supported on a ten year old Mac Pro (Mac Pro 4,1) was OS X 10.11 "El Capitan".

        OS X 10.11 "El Capitan" moved to "unsupported" in 2018.


        • curtisspendlove

          In reply to MikeGalos:

          Easy, killer. Ten was just a number I picked because it is easily divisible in my head. If it ends up being 6 or 8 instead, that's fine. (Also, not everyone needs to be on the latest OS. I know...I should have tagged that with "spoiler alert". Sorry.)


          My point:


          1 - Expensive, upgradable computer over longer time.

          2 - Multiple less expensive, non-upgradable computers over the same time period.


          Do I buy a Mac Pro divided over 6 years. Or 2 Mac Minis over 6 years.


          Disclaimer: Again, these are samples...not exact specifics. And I don't need anyone to solve it for me. I can factor everything into my own equations...thanks. ;)

      • wright_is

        In reply to curtisspendlove:
        I’m not 100% sure how “compatible with standard graphics cards” the new Mac Pro is. Can I buy the a “cheap” build in the fall, then toss a standard NVIDIA GPU into it in 2021? (Will there even be good NVIDIA drivers for macOS Alcatraz in 2021? I dunno.

        If it is anything like past models, the answer will be no. :-(

        You couldn't just slap any old graphic card in the old cheese graters, you needed specific cards and custom firmware.

    • MikeGalos

      In reply to skane2600:

      All-in-ones have lower support costs and higher margins. Apple is willing to put up with the costs of a stand-alone for the five figures per device market who have their own professional support staff but not for general consumers.

      • skane2600

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        Yes, in other words, the needs of the customer aren't their priority.

        • joeaxberg

          In reply to skane2600:


          I see what you saying. But in this case I think their customers were absolutely their priority. The customers being those who wanted a machine like this. Those who felt betrayed by the trash-can Mac Pro - which was an innovative disaster. I look at this new machine and see "apology."


          The truly interesting part to me is that Apple even made this machine. There has been a lot of talk about maybe Apple just getting out of this market. That they'll just be a consumer device company. They'll just be the iPhone company. That they are still willing to play in the high-end workstation market - I dunno, but it seems to say to me that they still intend to be a computer company.


        • MikeGalos

          In reply to skane2600:

          No. It's which customer.


          The studios who'll buy 100 $25,000 Mac Pros and have their support team manage them? Sure.


          The one-person shop who'll buy a minimal model and update as needed and take Apple Support time to help out when they screw up a configuration choice? No.


          • bob_shutts

            In reply to MikeGalos: I think you’re right. This isn’t for Joe Blow. And for that reason all the comments about price are misplaced. BTW this isn’t 1985—$5995.00 is damn reasonable for this in 2019. I still have some IBM PC catalogues from the old days when their top micro channel PCs topped out over 10 gs. Go look at what a top specced Alienware costs today. Hint: over $7,000.


            • wright_is

              In reply to Bob_Shutts:

              And how much will a top-specced Mac Pro cost? Probably in excess of $50K. The RAM, processor and video cards for a "fully specced" version will be between $30K and $50K, before Apple's usual markup.

              Heck, Dell want between $8K and $12K for a 28 core Xeon upgrade for their workstations - depending on the speed and configuration of the processor. Make it a dual-processor Dell workstation and you are well over $20K, before you get to memory, video cards or storage. I don't see Apple being cheaper, somehow.

              But, the point is, Dell and other manufacturers make hardware for all levels of customers, whereas Apple only make "real" PCs for very wealthy companies, who have a dedicated Apple workflow. Normal consumers who want a "Mac Pro, but with a consumer processor and graphics card", so they can expand memory as needed, slap in new drives as the existing ones get full, need to upgrade to a more powerful graphic card, are SOL.

              My current system had 32GB RAM, because I couldn't warrant more, when I bought it, but there was space for upping it to 64GB, if needed. Likewise, I didn't need a good video card, when I bought it, but I'm now thinking of playing games on it, so I can just swap out the nVidia 1050 card for something more potent. With Apple, I'd be stuck with an iMac and if I wanted to upgrade the RAM or video card, I'd have to buy a new one. If the display was too small for me, I couldn't just swap it out for a bigger display, I'd have to buy a new iMa... Oh, wait, no, no option for a bigger display, I'd have to take one with the "small" display, which I had to pay for and then buy a "big" external display for it. (Yes, with the display is hypothetical, the internal display could be used as a secondary display a bigger external display, but I don't have the choice of not taking a display, or having a full-fat desktop processor.)

            • MikeGalos

              In reply to Bob_Shutts:

              I compared this with it's equivalent at Dell. For the base model which is the only one where we actually know specs and price, it's about twice the cost of their 5000 series Precision Workstation offering the same specs.

              • bob_shutts

                In reply to MikeGalos: Mike I actually agree with a lot of what you say but for the life of me I can’t configure a Dell Precision 5820 tower with the graphics horse power the cheese grater seems to have. I will say this: at least you can go out buy the Dell right now!


                • MikeGalos

                  In reply to Bob_Shutts:

                  You can't configure a Mac Pro with that graphics horsepower today either. Well, not of the high-end ones they demonstrated. The AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo was only announced today two hours after the Apple announcement so nobody has them in stock yet. Check back in a few weeks.


                  Now, the base $6,000 model we're talking about isn't that hard to match in graphics power. But that wasn't demonstrated.

            • skane2600

              In reply to Bob_Shutts:

              But in 1985 "perfect" PC clones hadn't yet taken off, so those prices reflected IBM's near monopoly status.

              • MikeGalos

                In reply to skane2600:

                It's worth noting that IBM's high-end Microchannel machines rarely sold at retail. They ended up being sold to corporations that had existing IBM mainframe accounts at a "special" price by their IBM Account Representative.

                And even with that the MCA arrogance is a lot of what finally killed IBM as the industry leader who could ask any price it wanted.

  22. randallcorn

    And how about the $999 monitor stand? Makes Mac go faster I guess.

    Saw one news article that said well most people already have a stand so it takes $1,000 off of the monitor. Lame stupid comment. About like saying I already have wheels for my car so I will buy a new car without wheels. OK, not really a good comparison because you really need wheels. You don't need a monitor stand.

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