Apple’s iOS 13 Already Powering 50% of All iPhones

Posted on October 17, 2019 by Mehedi Hassan in Apple, iOS, Mobile with 27 Comments

Apple released iOS 13 on September 19, followed shortly by iPadOS on September 30. And although it’s only been around 26 days since the launch, Apple’s latest version of iOS is already powering a good majority of iPhones.

The company published iOS 13 and iPadOS usage stats via the App Store support page, which is what Apple uses to track iOS usage, reports The Verge.

The new stats aren’t anything too surprising, considering the fact that iOS updates often reach most iPhone users very quickly. iOS 12, for example, just took 23 days to hit 50%. iOS 13, on the other hand, is powering 55% of all iPhones introduced in the last four years, while 50% of all iPhones are running iOS 13.

As for iPadOS, 41% of iPads introduced in the last four years are running the latest version of iPadOS/iOS 13, while 33% of all iPads now use iPadOS.

And although iOS 13’s growth isn’t as good as that of iOS 12, when you compare it to other operating system updates–especially Android–the story is obviously a whole lot different.

Tagged with , , ,

Join the discussion!

BECOME A THURROTT MEMBER:

Don't have a login but want to join the conversation? Become a Thurrott Premium or Basic User to participate

Register
Comments (28)

28 responses to “Apple’s iOS 13 Already Powering 50% of All iPhones”

  1. Avatar

    bart

    Not sure this is a valid metric anymore. Every softwaremaker is pushing software out the door as soon as they can. Apple released iOS 13 knowing the presence of big bugs. Ms could have done the same with 1809, but blocked people from updating, making the uptake slower.

    Tell me which approach is better

  2. Avatar

    sannyashi

    Sannyashi

    I also received a notice on my iPhone. Every two days, we are updating this error with Apple. Is Apple now becoming like Microsoft Windows?

  3. Avatar

    anoldamigauser

    Not sure about anyone else, but it seems that 13.1.3 has totally munged OneDrive. When I select Photos, I see a metric crap ton of icons, emojis, thumbnails and other digital detritus.

    On the plus side, it is correctly uploading the photos I have taken, but to get to them I have to browse through files rather than photos.

  4. Avatar

    Stooks

    Buggiest iOS I have ever used since my first iPhone 3G. 4 releases and still big bugs.


    That said I still avoid Android like the plague.

  5. Avatar

    dontbeevil

    "Every year, some pretentious tech blogger has to remind his tech-infatuated (and probably Apple-loving) readers that there’s an Android update problem."


    Thurrot

  6. Avatar

    PeterC

    Ive found iOS 13 on the ipad to be really flaky.


    Two big issues for me are wifi and safari. The wifi issues are basically alot of dropped connections and hanging. Safari is now really buggy and freezes/crashes all the time and there's a really odd lock screen issue where the ipad suddenly defaults to the lock screen and then freezes.


    Software development certainly isn't what it used to be.



  7. Avatar

    dontbeevil

    the buggiest ios evaaaaaaaaaaaa



  8. Avatar

    bill_russell

    No, the story is not obviously a whole lot different. I have two Pixel 1's that are into their 4th year, and got android 10 the day of release. Of course if you like most that I see, have a samsung, well that's just the way it works with them, since they so heavily modify android. Apparently that hasn't bothered the actual users as samsung is still #1 for android phones by far in the US at least.


    Also, since android is more componentized than iOS, important pieces can be updated that don't need a full monolithic OS release. For example if a webkit vulnerability, that can be pushed out via the play store. In iOS it requires preparing a full iOS release to patch. This is becoming more and more the case with android where whole pieces of the core OS can be updated.

    • Avatar

      nbplopes

      In reply to Bill_Russell:


      Objectively this means that we have over 700 million active devices with IOS13 after less than a month. Walking up to over a billion fast. This gives a huge platform over which developers can work with to update their apps taking advantage of the new features and APIs offered.


      How many we have with Android 10? A couple of million if that much. This is niche. Why would than developer update their apps?


      The truth is that Google lost control over their software. Within reason most developers target their development efforts for Samsung and Huwaii devices. If and when Android 10 reaches those devices they might have a look at it .


      for users I don’t see the problem either. They get what they get.

      • Avatar

        anoldamigauser

        In reply to nbplopes:

        Unfortunately, it doesn't just work...which used to be the hallmark of iOS. If users get what they get, and are not happy about it, then it will become a problem. If they fix it fast enough, and get back to "it just works", then no harm, no foul.

        • Avatar

          nbplopes

          In reply to AnOldAmigaUser:


          Yes. I agree with you that how the last major update went through was quite uncharacteristic. Furthermore, I'm a techie so I went by ok, updating as soon as possible. But users that want something that moves them well forward into the future yet it just works, they may not be that happy at all, and questioning their choice even more, understandably. They are still trying the tap the holes.


          I really dislike Mr Tim Cook from a users perspective. Don't think he did that much for the products and its users. Oh well, Wall Street the Warren Buffet's of the world, Mr Tim Cook new best friends are very happy though.


          What will happen when the impulse energy generated by SJ leadership fades? Don't know. But the culture seams to be gravitating into something rather shallow in content, easy bucks and safe. At least my mind is starting to starve as the years pass by. More money and people is not equating into to better work and greater ambition for the future. Execution apart, both Google and Amazon look far more dynamic.


          SJ was the guy that after getting fired went on and lead a company that defined 3D animation and built one that defined next gen OSs and Development Environments over which the first web browser was developed. For instance. Apple lost that character. We now have a brilliant value manager that seams interested in politics and socializing with artists.

      • Avatar

        Chris Payne

        In reply to nbplopes:

        I know it's apples and oranges, but look at Windows 10. It took them 3-4 *years* to get to 700 million.


        Yes, blah blah a desktop OS is different, but I still think MS has a lot to learn when it comes to Windows updates.

    • Avatar

      Thomas Parkison

      In reply to Bill_Russell:

      Yes, certain things can be updated and patched as required because Android is modular however there's things that can't be patched. Case in point, this situation...

      arstechnica.com/information-technology/2019/10/attackers-exploit-0day-vulnerability-that-gives-full-control-of-android-phones/


      This needs to be patched via an OTA update. Do you think Samsung will patch their older phones? I'm not sure however I wouldn't hold your breath.

    • Avatar

      jules_wombat

      In reply to Bill_Russell:

      So you agree with Mehedi the Android user base does suffers from serious diversity in versions. Because most consumers choose Samsung or similarly constrained platforms.

  9. Avatar

    wocowboy

    I give Apple props for the speed and number of updates they have issued for iOS 13 since its launch. This is much better than making people wait months for a single large update to take care of annoying bugs. Bugs are a fact of life in software, we just have to deal with them. I don't like them any more than anyone else does, but I appreciate that Apple is doing a good job at taking care of them at this rate.

Leave a Reply