Microsoft Reveals the Windows 10 Version 1909 Developer Story

Posted on October 16, 2019 by Paul Thurrott in Dev, Windows 10 with 7 Comments

What does Windows 10 version 1909 mean to developers? As it turns out, absolutely nothing.

“Windows 10, version 1909 is a scoped set of features for select performance improvements, enterprise features and quality enhancements,” the Windows Developer Team writes in a new post. “Developers should be aware of this release, but no action is necessary at this time.”

Well, there you go. It doesn’t get any easier than that.

Because Windows 10 version 1909 is really Windows 10 version 1903 with a handful of new features, there are no new APIs for developers to target. So Microsoft will not issue a new version of the Windows SDK. Instead, the SDK for Windows 10 version 1903 is still the most up-to-date version.

OK, there is one thing, though it’s optional: In August, Microsoft released WinUI 2.2 with a new TabView control.

“We encourage everyone to use WinUI in their UWP apps – it’s the best way to get the latest Fluent design, controls, and is backward-compatible to Windows 10 Anniversary Update,” the team notes.

You can learn more about WinU 2.2 here.

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Comments (7)

7 responses to “Microsoft Reveals the Windows 10 Version 1909 Developer Story”

  1. evox81

    Uh oh... Here come the "see UWP isn't dead!!!!1!!" comments...

  2. eric_rasmussen

    Something I've noticed is that the Windows Store has added a few non-UWP apps that are super useful. Python, for example. After you install the Python store app, you get the Python command line utilities that you can run from the command prompt.


    It's not specific to 1909, but if Microsoft turned the store into something more like Debians apt repository it would be highly useful.


    I'm glad to see a quality focused release instead of features this time around! Well, hopefully.

    • longhorn

      In reply to Eric_Rasmussen:

      Creating a mobile appstore was a mistake. The strength of Windows is in desktop applications and games. Microsoft slowly realized this and started to allow Win32 games into the Store. Some Win32 applications will also be allowed for example Win32 Edge.


      But so far, the vast majority of applications that aren't UWP or Desktop Bridge are left behind.


  3. dontbeevil

    “We encourage everyone to use WinUI in their UWP apps – it’s the best way to get the latest Fluent design, controls, and is backward-compatible to Windows 10 Anniversary Update,” the team notes.

  4. aaastartech

    Amazing Post! Thanks for this valuable information. Hax Info

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