EU 3, U.S. 0

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The New York Times opines on Europe’s sweeping new antitrust laws. And on how the U.S. is doing absolutely nothing, at least so far, to rein in Big Tech.

In just the last few years, Europe has seen a landmark law for online privacy take effect, approved sweeping regulations to curb the dominance of the tech giants and on Friday was nearing a deal on new legislation to protect its citizens from harmful online content.

For those keeping score, that’s Europe: three. United States: zero.

The United States may be the birthplace of the iPhone and the most widely used search engine and social network, and it could also bring the world into the so-called metaverse. But global leadership on tech regulations is taking place more than 3,000 miles from Washington, by European leaders representing 27 nations with 24 languages, who have nonetheless been able to agree on basic online protections for their 450 million or so citizens.

In the United States, Congress has not passed a single piece of comprehensive regulation to protect internet consumers and to rein in the power of its technology giants.

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Comments (9)

9 responses to “EU 3, U.S. 0”

  1. anoldamigauser

    If our representatives would all remember that the point of a legislature is to legislate, and not posture for political points with their base, perhaps they could pass a bill.

    As it is, they stand for nothing but re-election.

    • Daishi

      Maybe to you it is. But to them the point is to let them make millions insider trading on classified briefings and getting piles of “donations” from corporations and billionaires to keep things just the way they are.

  2. miamimauler

    The U.S politicians can't go seriously against big tech/big business as they are fully owned and operated by big business.


    That ship sailed years ago. Corporations run America, not politicians with their snouts in the trough.


    What do you expect when election campaigns can cost millions if not more. The only way to pay for that is dark money.


    The U.S will continue circling the drain until dark money is taken out and politicians can get back to actually representing their constituents instead of big money.

    • Daishi

      The U.S will continue circling the drain until dark money is taken out and politicians can get back to actually representing their constituents instead of big money.


      Well you better grab your pitch fork and fire up the guillotine, because the only way that’s happening is with a good old fashioned revolution.

      • miamimauler

        @Daishi


        Oh yes, I'm fully aware the U.S is irreparably broken with no clear peaceful way of turning it around.


        It is an example for the rest of the world's Democratic nations on how to ruin a promising country by handing it over to the corporations. Thankfully, at least the EU have paid attention and are at least trying not to follow the failed U.S path.

  3. lvthunder

    Our lack of regulation is what allowed these companies to grow. Sure there are tech companies outside the USA, but none of them are as successful as the ones that are here.

  4. hrlngrv

    | 27 nations with 24 languages


    That's official languages, so ignores Basque, Catalan, Vlaams and Gaelic. That's just in the western part.


    Gotta wonder how much regulatory zeal in the EU is due to the targets of their zeal being US-based companies.

    • wright_is

      Given the fines and censure that European and Asian companies get, I'd say it has little to do with them being US-based companies. Just that most tech sites don't report on things like light-bulb cartels or CRT tube cartels run out of Europe and Asia, they mainly report on what happens to big tech.


      How much press did the Legoland Bavaria data breach get last month? I haven't seen anything outside of German reporting. Likewise, the Finphisher collapse, because they were illegally selling restricted technology to unfriendly regimes without an export license? Again, outside of the German press, I've seen very little about that.


      The 6 figure fines for SMS and cold-call spammers last month in the UK? Apart from El Reg, it got little traction in the US tech blogosphere. A majority of the tech English language tech reporting comes out of the USA and if it doesn't involve big tech, their supply chains or US news, it gets very little coverage.


      Yes, the DMA looks to be covering mainly US big tech, because US big tech is causing the most problems at the moment, mainly because of their size and the fact they are buying up upstart competitors left-right-and-centre and they are squeezing independents who use their platforms, all to the detriment of users and user choice.

      • miamimauler

        @wright_is


        "Yes, the DMA looks to be covering mainly US big tech, because US big tech is causing the most problems at the moment, mainly because of their size and the fact they are buying up upstart competitors left-right-and-centre and they are squeezing independents who use their platforms, all to the detriment of users and user choice"


        Exactly, well stated.