Fairphone 3 Launches at €450

Posted on August 27, 2019 by Paul Thurrott in Android, Mobile with 9 Comments

Fairphone announced today that its 3rd generation responsibly sourced and user repairable smartphone is ready for preorder in Europe.

“The Fairphone 3 is our newest response to the growing demand for a more ethical, reliable and sustainable phone,” Fairphone CEO Eva Gouwens writes in the announcement post. “This is the phone for all of us who dare to care about what kind of a world we’re creating with our purchase decisions. For all of us who want a great phone that is kinder to people and to the earth. For all of us who believe that care for workers and our planet ought to be a natural part of doing business.”

Fairphone is dedicated to building sustainable smartphone handsets that is ethically-made, responsibly-sourced, conflict-free, and uses as many recycled materials as is possible. Its modular design means that users can repair any component easily, and its predecessor, the Fairphone 2 earned a rare 10/10 score by iFixIt. The firm is “an ethically-minded mosquito in a room full of giants,” Gouwens says.

The bad news? It’s a mid-range phone that’s by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 632 processor, 4 GB of RAM, 64 GB of expandable storage, and a 5.65-inch Full HD+ display with a tall 16:9 aspect ratio. The cameras include a 12 MP single-lens rear camera and an 8 MP front-facing selfie camera. There are two SIM slots, stereo speakers

Then again, it will only cost €450.00 when it goes on sale on September 3. You can preorder now, assuming you live in Europe.

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Comments (9)

9 responses to “Fairphone 3 Launches at €450”

  1. maethorechannen

    Then again, it will only cost €450.00 when it goes on sale on September 3


    Only? I can get a UK spec Xaomi with similar specs for around 150. I'm ok with being a terrible human being if it saves me 300 odd quid/bucks/euros.

  2. Bats

    Let's get real here. No one is buying this phone.


    LOL....oh, please "...ethically-made, responsibly-sourced, conflict-free, and uses as many recycled materials as is possible...."


    Yah, right.


    If people are not buying the OnePlus phone(s), then they are definitely NOT buying the "fairphone"

    • Andrew Payne

      In reply to Bats:

      This is obviously not a mass market phone. Crazy Success for these guys probably is 10,000 units. But it is an important phone if only for bringing the social and environmental impact forward. Also fairphone is often able to load alternative operating systems. Niche but cool.

  3. RobertJasiek

    Some can afford to pay the €300 extra, some can't. Everything fair of this phone is worth the price, mostly because pioneered research in fair trade must be expensive. If the entire world traded fairly, everybody would only pay €30 extra, I'd guess. For greater longevity, such would be worth the price. Currently, only the "rich" and the smartphone abnegators can afford a perfect conscience.

    If I could afford the exess, I would not buy this specific smartphone because display ratio (2:1, not the typo 16:9, because it has 2.160 x 1.080) and size, and the Android update politics, do not fit my preferences. Every other hardware aspect would be good enough for me.

    I applaud Fairphone's efforts.

  4. waethorn

    "This is the phone for all of us who dare to care about what kind of a world we’re creating with our purchase decisions"


    Then maybe get a phone that doesn't have software made by a Big Tech company.

    • wright_is

      In reply to Waethorn:

      And, being sub-midrange at release (it is using last years mid-range chip), it doesn't speak for longevity. They should be thinking of the full life-cycle and offering a higher end device with 6 to 10 years of updates.

      I'd be happy to drop the cameras - we can't use them at work anyway, no cameras allowed on site, so we have to leave the phones at the door.

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