Dell Launches First Latitude-Branded Chromebooks

Posted on August 26, 2019 by Paul Thurrott in Chrome OS, Chromebook with 58 Comments

Working closely in partnership with Google, Dell today announced its first-ever enterprise-focused, Latitude-branded Chromebooks.

“The new Latitude 5300 2-in-1 and 5400 now come with secure and seamless Chrome Enterprise,” Dell’s Enterprise Chromebooks website notes. “We paired trusted devices and ProSupport with a cloud-native experience you’ll love.”

As with other recent Chromebook Enterprise-certified Chromebooks, like the Acer Chromebook 714 and HP Chromebook x360 14 I’ve examined so far this year, the new Latitude Chromebooks meet a growing need for this platform’s simplicity and security in the enterprise. To date, Chromebooks have seen the most success in education, where Chrome OS is now the number one platform, and with individuals and small businesses. But with so many larger businesses seeking simpler platforms than Windows, PC makers are starting to respond.

‘We worked intimately with Google to meet the expectations of a large enterprise and create the ecosystem to support it,” said Dell VP Brett Hansen told ZDNet. “We are actively engaging with enterprise customers about Chrome.”

Dell’s new Chromebooks provide both traditional laptop and 2-in-1 form factors, and they ship with Intel Celeron, Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 processors, 4 GB to 32 GB of RAM, and up to 1 TB of NVMe SSD storage.

The Dell Latitude 5300 2-in-1 Chromebook Enterprise ships with a 13.3-inch Full HD (1920 x 1080) display with a 360-degree hinge, plus a USB-C port, two USB 3.1 ports, HDMI for video-out, a headphone jack, and a memory card reader. Pricing starts at $820.

The Dell Latitude 5400 Chromebook Enterprise delivers a 14-inch HD (1366 x 768) or Full HD (1920 x 1080) display, with or without multi-touch. It has basically the same ports as the 2-in-1 but adds an additional USB 3.1 port and an Ethernet port. It starts at $700.

Like other modern Chromebooks, the new Dells support Linux applications in addition to Android applications. And Dell provides a Unified Workspace program that lets IT admins manage the devices from the cloud, plus 24/7/365 Dell ProSupport in addition to Chrome Enterprise support. Dell is reselling G Suite as well.

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Comments (58)

58 responses to “Dell Launches First Latitude-Branded Chromebooks”

  1. hrlngrv

    THANK YOU for a good picture of the keyboard. The 6-key cursor section on the bottom-right looks a lot better to me than the standard HP-like 4-key section with half size [Up] and [Down] keys. Shame they're too expensive.

  2. Bats

    Dell's production of these computers doesn't really mean much to me. Dell makes anything. They are even ready to make computers that run MacOS if they can. What matters more, alot of more, is who is buying/leasing these Chromebooks as it can signal a trend to the way how corporations/organization operates.

  3. red.radar

    It’s not like dell has to invest a lot to produce this product. They just image a standard windows laptop with different software. I am sure they do it based on the chance chrome os takes off... perhaps Google is paying for the effort..,



  4. wright_is

    Not to put a downer on this, and these devices seem very good, but have you covered the "use by" / "best before date" for Chromebooks?

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/08/22/buying_a_chromebook_dont_forget_to_check_when_it_expires/

    It seems like Google give the devices a maximum lifespan of 6.5 years, from original release, not from purchase date.

    That is a big no-no for corporate customers. They want to buy the same spec for years on end, to ensure they have a stable, level playing field. If they get the same specced laptop for 3-4 years, it means the newest ones would have to be replaced after 2 years, at best! Most companies where I have worked have had PCs for a minimum of 5 years, many for 10 years. With such short-term support, this doesn't sound very corporate friendly.

  5. wright_is

    Any word on when they will be released? The German website just says available soon.

  6. longhorn

    I think the debate is about this:


    Are you willing to accept a walled garden OS with one browser?


    Smartphone users say yes (but they also have access to many browsers running natively on Android)

    PC users say no


    Those born in the 70s or before probably have a hard time accepting that the future might give us less freedom than we used to have. Google becomes "an evil empire" although their intentions with Chrome OS might not be evil. I just think they should have built a real Linux platform with support for multiple browsers and cloud providers and not lock the platform around their own software/services.


    When people "hate" Chrome OS they "hate" limitation. They "hate" that limitation is pushed by OEMs. It's not very rational, just a sense that Google (or Microsoft if they produce a similar thing) tries to limit freedom with a "one browser OS".


    If Microsoft locked Windows to Edge, would you still feel comfortable?


  7. StevenLayton

    I’m seeing a pattern on this thread, where if anyone says anything positively about Chromebooks, or slightly negative out Windows they get downvoted, regardless of how valid the points are. But the fact is, for many, Chromebooks are all they need. Commence your down voting, deniers. lol

  8. Sprtfan

    Comments missing? I've noticed that a few comments that I have posted have gone missing. This happened a few days ago in the comments to a different story as well. Anyone else noticed this? I contacted support as well about the bug but wanted to see if it is happening to anyone else as well.

  9. branpurn

    It's difficult to say Google "supports" Linux applications on ChromeOS. It "supports" Linux applications about as much as Android "supports" Linux applications-- that is to say, it is reliant on the technology but not readily exposed to the end user.

  10. PeteB

    The chromebook revolution is upon us, MS apologists be damned.

  11. Ron Diaz

    For something that so many on this site claim aren’t selling at all they sure seem to keep making a lot of these Chromebooks....

    • longhorn

      In reply to Hypnotoad:

      You can unlock Chromebooks by installing Linux. Use every browser and cloud provider you want. Avoid Google spying. If you are willing to sacrifice Android integration there is a lot to gain. Many people take advantage of this as soon as they hit the wall with Chrome OS. Decent hardware is always appreciated.


    • MikeGalos

      In reply to Hypnotoad:

      Not just "so many on this site" but actual companies that measure these things. For example, Netmarketshare places them at between 0.36 and 0.40% of the laptop/desktop market every month throughout the last year. (I figured if I just cited one month you'd claim it was an outlier).


      That's not 36% or 3.6% but 0.36%. You know, like 99.64% buy something else.


      • hrlngrv

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        And 0.36% of 300 million units shipped is about 10.8 million Chromebooks shipped. Multiply that by 5 for units in use, and that may mean 54 million Chromebooks in use.

        No, not a huge market segment, but not nothing either. Also possible that OEMs make Chromebooks to keep MSFT more honest than it'd otherwise be.

        • longhorn

          In reply to hrlngrv:

          "And 0.36% of 300 million units shipped is about 10.8 million Chromebooks shipped. Multiply that by 5 for units in use, and that may mean 54 million Chromebooks in use."


          0.36% of 300 million is 1.08 million. Multiply that by 5 and you have 5.4 million Chromebooks in use.


          Maybe the truth lies between 5.4 and 54 million in use. Maybe around 10 million because you used Netmarketshare numbers which are lower than Statcounter numbers. It's a small number and will likely never get bigger. There is only a very small market for limited OSes. Windows and macOS will remain "kings" until they are killed for whatever reason. Hopefully won't happen during our lifetimes.


          No, not a huge market segment, but not nothing either. Also possible that OEMs make Chromebooks to keep MSFT more honest than it'd otherwise be.


          Competition is good. I'd say the competition between Windows and Chrome OS is weak, because they are different products. Chrome OS is a weak offering because it's so tied to Google and Google software/services, but that's just my opinion.


          • Stooks

            In reply to longhorn:

            "Chrome OS is a weak offering because it's so tied to Google and Google software/services, but that's just my opinion."


            I agree this is not only a technical limitation but increasingly the public is becoming aware of how tech companies like Facebook, Google and others are destroying their privacy online to make money.


            The only Google product I still use is Youtube. If there was an option that was almost as good I would switch.

        • Stooks

          In reply to hrlngrv:

          More people probably use the old version of Edge than use Chromebooks. Paul ALWAYS mocks the usage share of the old Edge, here and on Windows weekly. He also seems to be a champion for Chromebooks and PWA's....and all things Google these days.

        • MikeGalos

          In reply to hrlngrv:

          As mentioned above, you dropped a decimal point and it's roughly 1 million units.


          Your multiplier is wildly random and assumes that there are 4 working and in use Chromebooks for every one purchased. No reason to assume that's true or relevant.


          So we're left with a market that's a tiny fraction of the computing market. In fact, that's just the tiny fraction of just the laptop/desktop market and they really compete with the tablet and phablet markets as well.


          The reality is that it's likely that manufacturers are being paid by Google to produce the units as part of the deal to set Google.com as the default search engine. And, of course, they're basing those units on laptops made for the Windows market with trivial changes so the cost of producing a few devices for inventory is minimal even if they never sell any.


      • Pungkuss

        Why is Dell doing this? Why is Microsoft creating liteOS? Why did Google hint at more OEMs coming onboard? There is something happening with Chromebooks that betray the pure numbers. I think Google has a shot of gaining a nice chunk(10% in the next 5 years) of the Enterprise in America.
        In reply to MikeGalos:


        • Stooks

          In reply to Pungkuss:

          "I think Google has a shot of gaining a nice"


          They came out in 2011 and now have less than 1/2 of 1% market share. Outside of US public schools (k-12) they probably have less than .005% market share.


          Android app compatibility and PWA's was going to ignite the stale market for these browser boxes. Market share has only gone down since those two features have come out.

      • Paul Thurrott

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        Another measurement: All PC makers make Chromebooks now. Curious.

        • Stooks

          In reply to paul-thurrott:

          They have done the same thing for Linux (on and off) for years. Did that make a difference?


          Like Mike Galos said they are most likely being paid by Google to do so. Microsoft did the same thing, probably still does in some way....like pre-installing Windows gets them a discount on Windows.

        • MikeGalos

          In reply to paul-thurrott:

          Curious, indeed since the "another measurement" doesn't provide an actual motive for them doing so. Perhaps some journalists could ask their contacts why they're all in a market that has no volume and no growth. Seems like something that might actually be worth reading.


  12. VancouverNinja

    Brutal usage stats for Chrome OS - under 1% now...whatever these paper weights are being used for is anyone's guess. I still think their time is almost up and there is only so much cajoling Google can do to get support. It is simply one of the largest OS flops ever - maybe the biggest.

    • Paul Thurrott

      In reply to VancouverNinja:

      Guys, every post about a Chromebook doesn't need to be accompanied by this kind of thing. We get it. PC makers may see the point of Chromebooks, but you don't.

    • hrlngrv

      In reply to VancouverNinja:

      Your predictions of Chromebooks' demise are almost as regular and long-standing as predictions of the year of the Linux Desktop.

      How horrible the possibility may be for you that there could be some profit to be eked out selling 10-20 million Chromebooks/Chromeboxes per year.

      • VancouverNinja

        In reply to hrlngrv:

        Predictions of demise? It is dead. What do you need to prove it? Would less than .5% marketshare make you happier than 1%? The Chrome OS is dead as a competitive OS - period. How long has it been now almost 9 years and it's marketshare is basically non existent.


        To your point of eking out a profit - at the expense of users...A good value entry level PC makes way more sense than a limited Chromebook and has a value. Chromebooks are a waste, and distraction, of people's time and money. Google just doesn't know when to call it. That's all it is.

        • eric_rasmussen

          In reply to VancouverNinja:


          My kids use them in school and love them. They support the Android applications they use all the time. For them the platform makes sense, whereas on Windows they pretty much just use the thing to play games. My daughter, who is now in college, prefers her Chromebook over anything else we have in the house (Mac and Windows PCs). She uses Google Docs and prefers it since that's what she used in school. She uses Pixlr and a handful of Android apps to do everything she needs, and I have to say that the experience is reminiscent of MacOS in that everything just works.


          The fact that young people prefer them now is going to be a problem in the near future. Microsoft has achieved exactly squat in the education sector, and with all the constant fumbling over branding, security, botched updates, and a chaotic and confusing mess of an OS in Windows 10, I think it's only a matter of time before Windows goes away and Microsoft goes 50/50 on Azure and Office.


          EDIT: As an example of the confusing mess of Windows 10: My parents bought a new PC last year that came with Windows 10 S. It couldn't install the printer driver they needed for their new Canon multifunction printer/scanner, so they switched it out of S Mode. The switch didn't work because the Store needed an update, but the Store update also wouldn't install in 10 S. It's like nobody in Redmond ever actually used S Mode or any of the devices that got shipped out to retailers. After a week of frustration, my parents returned the PC and bought a Chromebox. It does everything they want and I haven't needed to go there to fix it since they bought it so it's been nice for me as well. :)


          It pains me to say it, but I don't see Microsoft surviving in the consumer market for a whole lot longer. By extension, I don't see them surviving in the business desktop sector either. I think they found a niche in development tools and in cloud solutions, so the company as a whole will be fine. I just don't see CShell or WCOS ever actually making it to market.

          • VancouverNinja

            In reply to Eric_Rasmussen:

            I am happy that your children love them. If people really loved them, and were using them as you imply, then the market share stats would show this usage; sadly it reflects that people (consumers) have shunned them as a choice for Personal Computing. I think you may be too close to Google (in your admiration of their offerings) to see they have failed in the PC space. I am just working of the facts and instead of Google seeing any bump in usage they have seen a decline over the last 12 months. It is a going nowhere platform - I also suspect that MS may have seen a rise in their K-12 market penetration from their efforts over the last 2 years, and this may be the exact reason Chrome OS is almost gone from the overall market usage stats. K-12 is the only channel keeping it on the board; water that down and it's gone.

            • eric_rasmussen

              In reply to VancouverNinja:


              I just looked up ChromeOS on StatCounter and in the United States usage share is sitting at around 6%. I suspect that has a lot to do with education since the usage share dropped substantially in June (from 6% to less than 1%) but there is an up-tick again now that schools are back in session. Looking at Windows, there was no up-tick in usage from June-August, which proves my point that kids aren't going back to Windows devices but rather using their phones when the Chromebook isn't around.


              This fact is what has Microsoft in trouble. I'm not saying that ChromeOS is going to win, it might be Android, iOS, or something else entirely, but BYOD is becoming more prevalent and young people entering the workforce are not nearly as tied to Windows as Gen X was.


              I honestly think that if Microsoft could stop punching themselves in the face as they have been over the past few years, they'd have a chance. If they could stop doing this, we might have yearly updates instead of twice-yearly, a single SKU of Windows for consumers, no S Mode confusion, and Android apps running on the desktop. All of these things are possible but instead Microsoft keeps pushing platforms like WinRT, 10 S, 10 S Mode, and now LiteOS / WCOS / whatever it's being called. Very little work is being put into making the desktop experience consistent, and while I absolutely love acrylic and their fluent design style, it's going to take a decade or more to bring the OS consistent at the current pace. For high-performance computing, NTFS is getting a bit long in the tooth compared to some of the newer SSD-optimized filesystems like ZFS and F2FS. I don't know why Microsoft isn't spending more time to make Windows 10 more like the "New Technology" push they did at the turn of the century.

            • Paul Thurrott

              In reply to VancouverNinja:

              Got it. Stop making the same noise over and over again and hijacking posts like this.

          • Paul Thurrott

            In reply to Eric_Rasmussen:

            You're bringing logic and facts to a religious debate. Don't feed the trolls.

        • hrlngrv

          In reply to VancouverNinja:

          Thank you for confirming that there would be little as awful for you as Chrome OS lingering for another decade or two.

    • Pungkuss

      Hilarious that you always mention this stat. It's obvious that OEMs don't care. Google noted that Dell is just the first, hinting at others in the weeds. It seems Google is prepping for a long fight. The market is big enough for more than one company to eat. I don't think the plan is to kill windows (can't be done), they just want a slice of the pie.
      In reply to VancouverNinja:


      • VancouverNinja

        In reply to Pungkuss:

        Sorry but that stat has gotten worse. Over the last year it has dropped from up to 2% to less than 1%. My point is that there is zero momentum for Chromebooks. Other than a launch attempt to try a gain some perceived marketshare by a manufacturer nothing says that Chromebooks are growing - rather the stats showing it shrinking. I just wonder how these things get used or do they get bought and then literally junked or abandoned? It's pathetic.

  13. MrPKI

    I wonder what actual enterprises have actually moved to a Chromebook standard?

  14. melinau

    My workload is almost entirely graphics (Images & photos) and some heavyweight spreadsheets, with a bit bof WP and general use thrown in. Much of what I am doing at any time involves using substantial compute resource. I don't really care where that is happening. I DO have serious concerns about the security of data being processedanalysed elsewhere, especially if the provider is Google.


    For myself I'm seriously looking at testing-out a ChromeOS device and anticipating some serious Applications becoming available for it. A major beef is the crappy state of Graphics screen resolution being foisted onto Chromebooks. As others have pointed-out the marginal manufacturing cost of a minimum of full HD is minimal, but these things still come with 1990's screen res.

    It's still a case of 'horses for courses', and heavily dependent on Broadband speed & availability, oh and centralised horsepower comes into the mix somewhere too!


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