Adobe Photoshop is Coming to the Web

Posted on October 26, 2021 by Paul Thurrott in Google Chrome, iPadOS, Microsoft Edge, Music + Videos, Web browsers with 11 Comments

In addition to delivering major Photoshop updates on desktop and iPad, Adobe today announced it is bringing Photoshop to the web. The firm also announced updates across other Creative Cloud apps and services, including Lightroom, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, After Effects, Fresco, Behance, Adobe Stock, and more.

“Today at Adobe MAX 2021, I am thrilled to announce a major feature release of Photoshop on the desktop and iPad,” Adobe’s Pam Clark writes. “In addition, we are trying something new by introducing a public beta of a new web-based share for comment workflow in Photoshop that is accompanied by a preview of a small set of Photoshop editing features all running on the web. In this beta, you and your collaborators can open and view your work in the browser, provide feedback, and make basic edits without having to download or launch Photoshop.”

Key improvements in Photoshop for desktop include hover auto-masking capabilities for the Object Selection Tool, a one-click Mask All Objects option for layers, new Neural Filters, a beta version of a Landscape Mixer tool that adjusts the season of a scene automatically, a Color Transfer capabilities that applies the color palette from one image to another, a Harmonization Neural Filter that intelligently adjusts an image’s hue and luminosity, and, perhaps most notably, copy/paste interoperability with Adobe Illustrator.

On iPad, Photoshop picks up Camera Raw file support, the ability to transform layers into Smart Objects, Dodge and Burn tools, and a new Share for Commenting feature that integrates with Photoshop for desktop.

And the new Photoshop on Web, now in beta, provides a subset of the full Photoshop product with Share for Commenting compatibility, basic editing capabilities, and more. It’s available for Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge.

Photoshop on Web is part of a larger Adobe initiative to bring as much of its Creative Cloud portfolio as possible to the web. You can learn more about that effort from the official Adobe blog.

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Comments (11)

11 responses to “Adobe Photoshop is Coming to the Web”

  1. lvthunder

    This could be useful. It can also be included in the product because it's a subscription now.

  2. usman

    I highly recommend people use Photopea, it's a PS alternative that is also a web app / PWA.


    Have been using it for nearly 2 years, it does all my basic editing needs.

    • ebraiter

      Tried it on some CorelDRAW drawings and they didn't show up well. 2 were from older versions.

      PNG files seemed OK.

    • Donte

      Affinity is what I would recommend. No web version but Windows and Mac and a fraction of the cost of the Adobe apps.


      They just updated their blog post today touting how fast their software runs on the new M1 Pro and M1 Max as they are native already on the M1, which got a 10% boost with their latest version as well.

      • Markld

        Affinity does meet my needs. I have now been using it for over a year now.

        When I give Photo Elements a try again every few months, I end up frustrated to a certain extent, as Affinity does it better (for me at least).



      • brothernod

        Is Affinity what Brad is always using? I can't recall.

    • Markld

      Thanks for Photpea heads up. I like stuff like that.

      It's decent and will meet needs

  3. bats

    This is not surprising, due to Photopea's rising popularity.

  4. scovious

    I am confused. Is this part of Creative Cloud subscription, or is this a public service like Google Docs?

  5. spacein_vader

    So the Creative Cloud sub finally lives up to its Cloud part. Took you long enough Adobe.


    And yes there are lots of alternatives to their software (photopea, light room, Gimp etc.) but much like MS Office even if they're better and cheaper they aren't the industry standard so you need to use them if you export your work to anywhere else.

  6. timwakeling

    Ah, look — proper sized buttons and UI text that you can actually read and click with your mouse (yes, I did say mouse; it's not just touch that benefits from larger UI). Looks really nice. I wonder when (or if) this more usable look will come to the desktop software version. I'm amazed every time I open it how ridiculous the font sizes and buttons look in 2021 on a nice (not Retina, just ordinary resolution) monitor.

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