Token Biometric Ring Will be Windows Hello Compatible

Posted on June 29, 2017 by Paul Thurrott in Windows 10 with 22 Comments

Token Biometric Ring Will be Windows Hello Compatible

Microsoft today revealed a new third-party accessory that should be of interest to Windows fans: The Token biometric ring will be Windows Hello-compatible and will allow users to sign-in to their Windows 10 PCs seamlessly.

“We’re thrilled to work with Token to make the Windows Hello experience even better,” Microsoft’s Chris Hallum says. “With its wearable design, Token logs you into Windows 10 seamlessly in a way that feels natural and familiar.”

The Token Ring, as its called—I will try to avoid joke about Tolkien’s Ring trilogy or the token ring technologies of the past—won’t ship until December 2017, and even then it will be US-only and will cost $250. But it does look interesting.

It’s made of sterling silver, and will come in 7 different sizes. (Token will send those who preorder the ring a sizer in advance.) It will come in brushed silver, black rhodium, or 14k rose gold finishes, the latter two of which will cost $50 extra.

More interesting is how it works: Before you put on the ring, you scan your fingerprint into a reader that’s built into the inside of the device, authenticating you. Then, Token can pass this authentication through to Windows Hello when you are near your PC. If you remove the ring, your credentials are locked in the device’s secure element.

Token isn’t just for Windows 10’s Hello feature—it will work with payment systems, smart door and car locks, transit cards, and in other scenarios. And it offers two weeks of battery life, which is a plus.

Looks interesting.

 

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Comments (22)

22 responses to “Token Biometric Ring Will be Windows Hello Compatible”

  1. Thayios

    VERY nice, I could easily get used to that if it actually works as intended. I need a ring for my other hand now, so this works. I refuse to pre-order anything anymore though


  2. chrisrut

    Shades of E.E. "Doc" Smith! "The Lensman Series" (Sci-fi from the 30s) has come to life :-)

    Gotta get me one of them...

  3. webdev511

    I can see a use for this in places where you can't use a webcam for login. That said we already have options for those places like fingerprint reader, yubi key, etc.

  4. Tony Barrett

    $250 just to logon? That's one seriously expensive way of avoiding typing in a password.


    It's not exactly theft proof either is it.....

  5. primushed

    If only they talked to each other, it would be the triumphant return of the Token RIng network...

  6. nbplopes

    This is very interesting and it can be huge, really huge.

  7. MikeGalos

    Seems pretty well thought through and they've got partnerships with all the key players and are supporting all the key industry specs. Nicely done, people.

  8. hrlngrv

    Why not have employers insist on subcutaneous chips, like for pets? The fashion conscious could do it to themselves.

    Then again, I'm someone who can't stand wearing any jewelry, so I'm biased against money wasters like this.

  9. Boris Zakharin

    Haven't they ever heard of token ring networks? Are they trying to confuse us on purpose?

  10. Eric Dunbar

    Fail. " it offers two weeks of battery life"

    This is but one of its many Achilles' heels. Something like this ring to rule them all has to be 'set and forget'. Either you wear it all the time or you'll never. Unless they devise a charging mechanism that can charge using body heat I don't see this going anywhere.

    It's an interesting concept but my gut says it's not ready for prime time yet.

    Yet another expensive toy to sit unused.

  11. DixonLeung

    1. Another device that that needs a proprietary charger. It doesn't say how long a charge will last but I assumed it is very long since it doesn't do much. Would be even more amazing if they allow our body heat or motion to keep it charged.
    2. It may be good for security that it will only recognize one fingerprint (no sharing), but that means that accidentally cutting that finger (kitchen accident) would make it unusable. Conspiracy theory says it is to make us buy two.
    3. It isn't clear, but it would be nice if we know how the fingerprint information is stored in the ring, e.g., what kind of hashing algorithm is used so that no one can decrypt the static fingerprint image.
    4. Let's hope nobody puts a gun to my head to unlock car, door, or computer, or pay for whatever.
  12. Stoicjim

    A SECRET DECODER RING! TAKE MY MONEY!

  13. illuminated

    I dreamed about this. Finally! Awesome!

  14. Daekar

    This is the first wearable I can actually see myself buying and wearing. Very interesting. Will watch with interest.

  15. 2ilent8cho

    Makes the Apple Watch doing the same thing currently on MacOS seem very reasonably priced, and the watch is a lot more useful than a ring. Microsoft had their chance with their phone and band, but they messed that one up and now they come up with this??

    • IanYates82

      In reply to 2ilent8cho:

      This isn't a Microsoft invention. It's (going to be) from a third party and Microsoft is saying it'll be hello compatible.


      It's not a product for me but I can see it's a neat application of technology. If I was maybe fifteen years younger, so not getting married for another five years, I'd probably look to get this in my wedding ring as a "why not" add on.

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