April 2018 Update Hits 84 Percent of Windows 10 PCs

Posted on July 26, 2018 by Paul Thurrott in Windows 10 with 12 Comments

The latest AdDuplex report indicates that the April 2018 Update has made its way to over 84 percent of all PCs running Windows 10 out in the world.

“As April 2018 Update has reached 3/4 of all PCs running Windows 10 last month, it was clear that the growth can only slow down,” the latest AdDuplex report notes. “While that definitely happened, [this update] still gained more than 6 percent [usage share in the past month].”

According to AdDuplex, the April 2018 Update is now installed on 84.2 percent of all Windows 10 PCs out in the world. By comparison, the previous version, the Fall Creators Update, is on 10.3 percent of Windows 10 PCs. All previous versions are on less than 3 percent.

AdDuplex has also provided a new breakdown of the relative popularity of various Surface PCs. The Surface Pro 4 leads the pack, with 31.47 percent usage share within the family. Rounding out the top five are Surface Pro 3 (20 percent), Surface Pro (2017) (17.4 percent), Surface 3 (10.22 percent), and Surface Book (6 percent).

As you may recall, AdDuplex is the largest cross-promotion network for Windows apps, and the firm empowers developers and publishers to promote their apps for free by helping each other.

 

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Comments (16)

16 responses to “April 2018 Update Hits 84 Percent of Windows 10 PCs”

  1. justme

    Admittedly, I am curious about this. My own beloved Surface Pro 3 runs Windows 8.1. Is Microsoft actively trying to get everyone to upgrade to 1803 somehow?

    • warren

      In reply to JustMe:


      Feature updates are delivered in the same way as monthly security updates, but with the option to delay the update for several months. They're basically Service Packs. And since each one is basically an incrementally better version of Windows 10, there isn't really a good reason to turn them down.

    • MikeGalos

      In reply to JustMe:

      Windows 8.1 is now a month shy of 5 years old, is out of Mainstream Support, no longer gets feature or compatibility updates and only gets security fixes as part of Extended Support. It loses even that limited support in January, 2023.


      So, yeah. Microsoft want to get everyone off Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 SP1 and onto the fully supported Windows 10. And as a service driven OS they want all users of Windows 10 to keep their OS up to date with the latest fixes.

      • justme

        In reply to MikeGalos:

        Apologies - my question wasnt in regard to Windows 8.1 or the limited support for it (of which I am quite aware). It was more to do with looking at Paul's chart and seing the number of builds listed and the numbers of each being run. I expected 1709's share to be larger than it is. I didnt expect the other builds listed to be as low as they are. Thats why I was wondering if Microsoft was doing something to actively push it (ala GWX or something similar).


        Regarding 8,1 - I know Microsoft want me to move to Windows 10. I've used 10 for myself and for work - I simply dont care for it - for a lot of reasons well beyond the scope of what Paul posted. I dont really gain anything other than hassle by moving to 10 right now. As a Windows gamer, however, I know I will eventually need to deal with it - but again, this is beyond Paul's original post.

        • MikeGalos

          In reply to JustMe:

          Since Windows 10 is a service driven product it's automatically updated. That there are any of the old builds present in Internet connected PCs (and that's really what the numbers reflect since they're from an online ad service) reflects mostly corporate users who delay implementation so they can do controlled corporate roll-outs.

  2. NT6.1

    More like 84% of Windows 10 PCs that use the Store.

    • PeteB

      In reply to NT6.1:

      Which is 0.1% of Windows 10 PCs. Most people just ignore that trashdump store of third worlder knockoff apps.

      • fbman

        In reply to PeteB:

        I actually do use the windows store, yes 95% of the stuff in there is utter trash, but the andriod and apple app store is no better.


        I mostly use the windows store to buy the xbox anywhere games and I downloaded the store version of Itunes (makes updating easier) and I downloaded whatapp desktop app as well.

        • wright_is

          In reply to fbman:

          At home, I use the store for some things. There are a few gems in there. At work, the Store is blocked by policy. That said, 90% of the Windows 10 PCs at work are already on 1804.

          The transfer from Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 is being carried out as the old PCs come up for replacement.

          A few older applications that need XP or XP-Mode are having to be dealt with as virtual machines and as locked off from the general network as possible...

  3. longhorn

    The bigger story is that Windows 7 is just as big as Windows 10 despite free/forced upgrades.

    Netmarketshare says Windows 7 is bigger, Statcounter says Windows 10 is bigger.

    Time to celebrate 3 years of Windows 10? :) It's on July 29.

    We have seen technical progress, but we also see that MS is clueless about users' needs despite all the telemetry and feedback programs.


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