Microsoft Releases Two New Windows 10 Insider Preview Builds

Posted on August 10, 2018 by Mehedi Hassan in Windows 10 with 14 Comments

Microsoft is releasing two new builds of Windows 10 today. The company has released Redstone 5 build 17735 for Insiders in the Fast Ring, and 19H1 build 18214 for Insiders in Self Ahead.

Both the builds include nothing new.

On the Redstone 5 build, Microsoft has included a number of general bug fixes and improvements. Notably, the build fixes an issue with Fluent Design’s Reveal effect which was removed with the last build. In this build, Microsoft has brought back the Reveal effect throughout the OS. The company is yet to fix the issue with Fluent Design’s Acrylic background effect not showing up in some parts of the OS.

As for the 19H1 build, Microsoft hasn’t included any new features. The build includes all the new features that were shipped as part of an older Redstone 5 build, including Your Phone support, but that’s about it. Keep in mind that this is the next version of Windows 10 that will be released in the first half of 2019, and as Microsoft is mainly focused in polishing the Redstone 5 release for the public, it’s not surprising to see any new features in the latest 19H1 build for now.

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Comments (14)

14 responses to “Microsoft Releases Two New Windows 10 Insider Preview Builds”

  1. TEAMSWITCHER

    I love the wallpaper in the screen shot... It's straight out of macOS 10.14 Mojave. Market confusion?

  2. Jorge Garcia

    They don't need new features, or any more polishing...they just need to focus on fixing the updating thing. I'm a huge Windows fan, but Windows 10 has made me lose trust in my PCs. If I crack open my laptop, I need to have total faith in the idea that I might actually be able to get my intended work done -immediately- and not be rudely interrupted by a blue screen of updating. If I, a self-described PC geek, feel this way, imagine how someone who is ambivalent about Windows feels these days once an interruption in their workflow like that happens to them (and it will, if they use Windows). Mobile OS's don't do that to you, ever, so that has become the computing standard now in people's minds. It's the reason why a semi-abomination like DeX was created...being a mobile-first operating system, you can at least KNOW that you WILL be able to open up the device, even after a few weeks of it collecting dust, and simply use it for what you want it to do, at that moment, not in 10 minutes. Normal people just aren't interested in waiting for their computers anymore, and this will be the primary undoing of Windows outside of enterprise applications. I'm still convinced that this is the reason Terry Myerson got dismissed, he just let it go too far.

    • MutualCore

      In reply to JG1170:

      I disagree. I want Fluent Design throughout the OS. I want all the Control Panel stuff(sans some legacy crap) migrated to Settings. I want UI consistency. These things are important!

      • hrlngrv

        In reply to MutualCore:

        How to define legacy?

        Certainly the infrared and phone/modem stuff could be viewed as not worth upgrading. Or dropped. OTOH, what about configuration applets for old printers? It's unlikely a printer maker is going to invest any time or effort on anything for a printer model they stopped making 6 years ago.

        For such things alone, Control Panel isn't going anywhere . . . unless MSFT built in another section under System or Devices maybe named something other than Legacy with links in the right hand part for 3rd party .CPL files. The dialogs would remain, er, traditional, but they'd be available from Settings rather than Control Panel.

        I figure the sticking point is the parts of Control Panel which remain in the Control Panel windows, i.e., not displaying another window or dialog. Perhaps those parts are too tightly bound with File Explorer.

      • John Muir

        In reply to MutualCore:

        Great but that should be your choice, not forced down everyones throat that they neither want it nor want to take the monthly risk of large changes.


        after 30 years of using windows, a chrome book or linux is looking like a great idea. or anything really that dosnt have the most retarded update policy on the entire planet.


        they are literally losing lifelong fans over this (inc businesses) and gaining no new ones.


        large businesses forced into updating 100k pc's per month with a full service pack that could break almost anything is a really bad idea, as that will break 1-2% of them at least and thats a very large cost to fix.


        pity the open letter detailing how broken the whole update strategy is wasn't received at all within MS. The letter was correct.


        we can only hope someone with brains will step up to the plate.

      • quackers82

        In reply to MutualCore: I agree there needs to be UI consistency and this is one of my biggest hates about Windows 10. But i do not want Control Panel migrating to Settings, i want Settings to die , shown the door and it all to be in Control Panel. Settings looks horrid, and the white space there is horrifying.

        I still like to close applications by double clicking the top left of the Window. Been like this since Windows 3.1 for me, plus i use a Mac a lot which has controls in the top left so force of habit i aim there. So load Windows explorer in Windows 10 and you can still do this, now load a modern app like the Solitaire Collection and try and quit it that way, nope cannot do it and it will just keep changing windows size instead.

        Under the hood Windows 10 performs quite well, its just constantly let down by very VERY bad UI design, worse start menu ever, inconsistency , and just lack of trust with the OS. Luckily i only use Windows now for steam as Windows 8 made me buy my first Mac so all my important stuff is done on an OS that is designed for a mouse and keyboard and has a consistent appealing GUI that i know will not be trying to update itself when i need to get that spreadsheet open quickly.


      • Jorge Garcia

        In reply to MutualCore:

        Ok, sure, but in addition to fixing the updating thing. You simply cannot hijack your customer's computer in 2018.

    • John Muir

      In reply to JG1170:

      totally agree, their updating policy atm is as thick as shi*. it just took 9 hrs for mine to download and update, the internet unusable the entire time ? I mean WTF MS what the hell do you think you are doing with a full service pack every single bloddy month.


      admittedly out in the sticks here the internet is slow, BUT that still dosnt mean you should use 100% of my bandwidth just when YOU decide you want to start the downloads for this month, luckily I dont need this pc for work online as that would be unbearable.


      Ive managed to delay 1709 up to the max of 365 days so far, to be fair Ive let it try to install itself a couple of times and it does the same retarded behaviour each time, consumes 100% of my internet for like 4 days, then trys the install, reboots, fails, rollsback, THEN does the download again - so effectively, come sep when it decides the 365 delay is long enough, my internet will be pegged at 100% permanently while it tries to download and apply 1709. Cant it work out after 4 failures so far to not try this again ???


      Its like they have taken "Windows ME" thinking and applied it to updates. UpdateME. Its beyond stupid.


      I either need to do a full reinstall or disable windows update next month. Thanks MS !

      • Mike Cramer

        In reply to John_Muir:


        You can restrict the bandwidth of upates, both downloads and uploads. In Settings search for 'Delivery Optimization' then choose Advanced options.


        If you don't like to search, go to Settings > Update & Security > Advanced options > Delivery Optimization > Advanced options.

  3. hrlngrv

    I can understand R5 being mostly fit and finish at this point, but there would have had to be a serious issue with 19H1 to justify a new build with no new features. Otherwise, new builds for the sake of new builds alone is Insider-hostile.

  4. PeteB

    Those ugly, random, giant mono tiles still cluttering the start menu, completely out of place - like an elephant on top of a tree and no one knows how it got there.

    • NazmusLabs

      In reply to PeteB:

      start screen folders actually allows me to organize the apps the way I want. Use it and you may love it, insha’Allah!


      And Allah knows best.


      P.S. There was a experimental glass tile UI that leaked a year ago. Don’t know when or if it’ll come, but it looked gorgeous, and not like the ugly blobs of today.

    • CompUser

      In reply to PeteB:
      Unpin them all, drag the right edge all the way to the left, and just use the All Programs menu. It's basically like an updated Windows 7 Start Menu at that point. That's what I've done on all my systems, and it's great.


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