HP Delivers AMD-Based ProBook Laptops for Small Businesses

Posted on January 24, 2019 by Paul Thurrott in Hardware, Windows 10 with 5 Comments

HP today announced its sixth-generation AMD-based ProBook laptops for small businesses, delivering more modern designs, better performance and battery life, and enterprise-grade security and connectivity.

“Powered by Windows 10 and advanced AMD Ryzen quad-core processors, the HP ProBook 445 G6 and HP ProBook 455 G6 PCs are designed for today’s workforce and help keep professionals productive in the office and on the go with the power, style, and value that growing businesses need,” an HP representative told me.

Both PCs will be available later this month, with prices starting at $549. Key features include:

Modern design. The new-generation ProBooks feature slimmer bodies with clean edges, nearly-borderless displays, and 180-degree hinges for lay-flat functionality.

Modern innards. Based on AMD Ryzen quad-core processors and integrated AMD Radeon Vega Graphic graphics, the new ProBooks provide long battery life and quick charging capabilities. Both ship with 16 GB of RAM, 128 GB to 1 TB of storage, and 1366 x 768 (LCD) or 1920 x 1080 (IPS) displays; the ProBook 445 utilizes a 14-inch display, while the ProBook 455 comes with a 15.6-inch display.

Improved security and management. The new ProBooks ship with a range of security features, including HP BIOSphere Gen4 firmware and the HP Connection Optimizer self-healing wireless driver technology.

As always, HP is also providing a wide range of accessories for the ProBooks, including a power adapter, USB mini-dock, various video adapters, and an optional three-year next-day onsite support package.

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Comments (5)

5 responses to “HP Delivers AMD-Based ProBook Laptops for Small Businesses”

  1. Avatar

    ben55124

    1366 x 768. For the employee you wish would quit.

  2. Avatar

    SebastienJRM

    It baffles me that the 1366x768 resolution panel remains the standard option. I was stuck with one of these panels on a 2018 ProBook 640 G3. It was a non-issue with two 1080p external monitors via docking station while at my desk, but whenever on-the-go that low-res panel is just painful for any discernable level of productivity. Large corporations wanting to keep their laptop expenditures low won't even consider paying the negligible upgrade cost to the 1080p panel when it's not the standard option, and employees get shafted in the process.


    Come on, HP. Ditch the low-res panel and make 1080p the standard option. Every major PC maker should do the same.

  3. Avatar

    waethorn

    The way to read HP's business product numbers is this:


    XYZ G#


    X is the series.

    200 series is their all-purpose budget business systems, generally with last year's processor models.

    400 and 600 series are the Pro models, with pretty standard options, but don't expect high-end options like Thunderbolt in the 400's. 600 series will have docking station connectors and slightly better build quality (higher standards compliance for durability).

    800 series are Elite models, which are going to have more aluminum in the chassis and higher-end options. These will be the premium enterprise systems with all the bells and whistles possible.

    AFAIK 1000 series numbers are exclusively for certain model EliteOne all-in-ones with higher specs than comparable 800's.

    And then there's the Z-models which are all workstation and high-end media production systems. Cream of the crop, but sometimes don't always offer the best mobility, in favour of performance. For instance, laptops will have options for desktop processors. Z models will have more ISV-certified pro graphics options (Radeon Pro & Quadro).

    SSD's are available in all series, but the specs of the SSD will get better as you go up. 200 series are often cheap 2.5" SATA SSD's with limited size options, whereas as you go up you'll get into M.2 SATA, and then M.2 NVMe PCIe, and usually a few speed grades in PCIe too.

    This applies to laptops, as well as desktops.

    The main take-away here is that a 2 is lower than a 4 is lower than a 6, and so on. Price will reflect that as well, so there's lots of options regardless of your budget.


    Y is the screen size

    0 for desktops (no screen, or all-in-one)

    3 for ~13"

    4 for ~14"

    5 for ~15", etc.


    Z is either 0 or 5. 0 for Intel, 5 for AMD.


    They will usually have a G# for the generation. A 455 G4 is going to be a ProBook with lower specs than a comparable 655, both are 15", and AMD. A 455 G4 will be an older AMD processor than a 455 G5, but the rest of the spec updates will be only evolutionary.


    There's probably some other details that I don't know about, but these are the basics.

  4. Avatar

    dontbe evil

    no technical details about cpu and gpu in this article ... just a genric ryzen and vega without specify the model, version ecc...

  5. Avatar

    madthinus

    The true legacy of Windows 8: 1366 x768

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