Windows 10 Version 1903 Continues Rolling Out Slowly

Posted on June 27, 2019 by Paul Thurrott in Windows 10 with 22 Comments

According to a new report, Windows 10 version 1903 is only installed on 6.3 percent of Windows 10 PCs out in the world. That’s just a 5 percent gain over last month and it puts this feature update on pace with its slow-moving predecessor.

“Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903) has gained around 5 percent [usage] since last month and is now on 6.3 percent of close to 100,000 PCs surveyed,” the latest AdDuplex report reveals. “This puts it on par with the pace of [Windows 10 version] 1809 one month after its re-release. And this is, probably, not a good sign as we’ve seen how [that] ended (just over 30 percent install base before the next release went out).”

By comparison, last month, Windows 10 version 1903 hit just 1.4 percent of all Windows 10 PCs out in the word.

AdDuplex does note one curiosity to these numbers: About 65 percent of the PCs that upgraded to Windows 10 version 1903 using the May 2019 Update were previously running Windows 10 version 1809. This suggests that users on the previous Windows 10 version will not be stuck there while older Windows 10 PCs are upgraded.

AdDuplex also notes that the data makes it clear that developers will need to support three Windows 10 versions going forward: Windows 10 versions 1903, 1809, and 1803. And that’s interesting, given that one of the goals for Windows 10 was less fragmentation. But there are now several supported versions of Windows, when you include other supported versions of Windows 10 plus Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. So Microsoft’s goal has not, and will not, be met: Fragmentation is worse because of Windows, not better.

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Comments (22)

22 responses to “Windows 10 Version 1903 Continues Rolling Out Slowly”

  1. Thom77

    I wonder how many people dont have room for the non stop bloatware updates. 2 updates ago, I needed 4Gb of free space on my entry level Go that I didn't have.






  2. davidlbangs

    The recent Windows 10 versions are extremely similar. Really no big deal.

  3. codymesh

    Is this chart supposed to be surprising? Microsoft has already said that they aren't automatically upgrading users like before, they aren't forcing the upgrade on supported versions of Windows, even if the user checks for updates.

  4. codymesh

    "fragmentation is worse because of windows, not better"

    lol. I give it 3 years before the obvious conclusion about so-called fragmentation - a made up nonsense talking point - is published here.


    Giving users more control over updates was always going to result in fragmentation. Ever considered that maybe that's why Microsoft was so reluctant to do so?


    You guys wanted Microsoft to abandon 'windows as a service'. So here we are.

  5. PanamaVet

    I received the 1903 update recently on a 5 year old Dell without having clicktrapped "Check For Updates".


    It ran smoothly and completed in about 15 minutes.


    Since then everything has worked very well as usual.


    I guess that puts me in the silent majority. BooRah!!!


  6. BruceR

    "AdDuplex also notes that the data makes it clear that developers will need to support three Windows 10 versions going forward: Windows 10 versions 1903, 1809, and 1803. And that’s interesting, given that one of the goals for Windows 10 was less fragmentation."

    How could this ever be different (past or future), given feature updates every six months which are supported for 18 months?


    "But there are now several supported versions of Windows, when you include other supported versions of Windows 10 plus Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. So Microsoft’s goal has not, and will not, be met: Fragmentation is worse because of Windows, not better."

    Microsoft's goal of less fragmentation will be met in the future when Windows 7/8.1 die.

    • Greg Green

      In reply to BruceR:

      MS’ goal of less fragmentation will not be met. Shortly after Win7 support ends there’ll be another version of Win 10. By the time support for Win 8.1 ends there’ll be two more versions of Win 10.


      As MS adds more old Win 10 devices to the Not Upgradable list they’ll have to extend the support schedules to keep people from losing the safe use of two and three year old hardware.

      • codymesh

        In reply to Greg Green:

        the various versions of Windows 10 are closer in parity than Windows 7 or 8.1 ever were, so it still will be an improvement


        Also, Microsoft has effectively abandoned 'windows as a service', which also effectively kills the goal of less fragmentation.

  7. SaintKaze

    win10 1903. Kind of messed up one my workstations and haven;t been able to fix it even with rolling it back. haha oh well i'm glad it wasn't my main system.

  8. truerock2

    Out of 11 PCs, I have 3 2-year-old HP Envy notebooks that have upgraded automatically to 1903. My experience is that a 1 to 2 year old PC is the optimal vintage for updating to the latest version of Windows 10. I have a 6 month old HP Envy notebook that hasn't updated - which doesn't surprise me because HP is still shipping updates frequently for the 802.11 drivers and the sound/speaker drivers.


    I have a 7 year old PC I built in 2012. Obviously Microsoft does not select it for automatic upgrade to 1903. I manually upgraded that PC to 1903 and it seems to be OK... I might be seeing a problem with some of the functions on ssa.gov.

    • red.radar

      In reply to truerock2:

      I manually upgraded to 1903 but have had several quality issues. My main machine is 4 yrs old. I also wonder if the testing is not occuring on the older hardware and as a result these feature updates are indirectly obsoleting hardware. I would have been ok staying on 1803 however it goes EOL soon.


      I am not implying anything sinister, just this windows as a service is not delivering the value to me.

  9. cwfinn

    My wife's Surface Pro 6, bought at a Microsoft store in DC, still doesn't have 1809 after 3 months. Sheesh

  10. Pbike908

    I am one of the (un)fortunate souls who received the update...


    Since the update, it will no longer enter into sleep mode due to:


    [SERVICE] DeviceHarddiskVolume3WindowsSystem32svchost.exe (UsoSvc)

    Universal Orchestrator


    I guess I need to do a reset and then install all of my apps again...So sad....

  11. ggolcher

    In half a year Windows 7 goes out of support, and Windows 8.1 has minimal market share. Soon we can disregard them.


    So companies will have to support 3 very similar versions of Windows. That's exactly like the macOS landscape where the standard is to support the last 3 versions regardless of adoption, and that's worked out well enough for a long time.


    I don't find this terrible. Not ideal, but not as bad as before, where companies had to support Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 all at the same time.

  12. dontbe evil

    Wow an update released officially only few weeks ago it's only on 6% what a surprise, plus many "cool" people here do everything to block updates... Can you tell me the percentage of last android update released one year ago?

  13. wright_is

    I've updated 10 PCs with it today and another half dozen over the last 2 weeks (test PCs, now rolling out to all users).

  14. blackcomb

    I'm great with LTSC 2018. Security updates only. No bloatware.

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