Tip: Get the New Windows 11 Media Player Now

Posted on January 6, 2022 by Paul Thurrott in Windows 11 with 9 Comments

You won’t in any way be impressed by this, but if you really want the new Windows 11 Media Player app, here’s how to do so.

First, and most obviously, you need to be running Windows 11. I assume you’re on the stable/release version, as I am, because you can get the new Media Player app now via the Windows Insider Program’s Dev and Beta channels already.

Second, check out the original source of this tip, which is ghacks. It’s reasonably straightforward.

As hinted at by the URL of the Store listing for this app, it is exactly what I thought it was, an updated version of the Groove Music app that now supports video playback as well. Amazingly, it’s even less full-featured, which is saying something.

Enjoy.

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Comments (9)

9 responses to “Tip: Get the New Windows 11 Media Player Now”

  1. techm2

    This is great, Paul! Downloaded, installed, and testing now.

  2. brettscoast

    Thanks Paul, will check it out.

  3. matt11to5

    Oh wow. It looks really nice!

  4. wright_is

    From the colours, it looks almost Zune-esque at first glance.

  5. scovious

    Is there native H.265 support now or is that still sold separately?

  6. SvenJ

    This replaced Groove, not Windows Media Player. Not sure that's clear.


    • cmucodemonkey

      Paul in the article: "As hinted at by the URL of the Store listing for this app, it is exactly what I thought it was, an updated version of the Groove Music app that now supports video playback as well."


      This seems pretty clear to me.

  7. dftf

    As-decent as I find the Groove Music app today, I can't see merging the "Films & TV" app into it is going to suddenly make loads of people use it when it still needs support for more codecs. And things like VLC Media Player and Media Player Classic - Home Cinema are both free, and yet somehow manage to play all the formats I've ever needed, without making me go into the Microsoft Store to purchase a codec!


    If third-party apps can just use open-source or free codecs, why can't Microsoft use the same ones too?

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